A chance to apply some of the PCT academy's contributions`

[From Dick Robertson, 2009.05.07.1717CDT]

I just got invited by a young man who is seems to be a student at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, and is reading one of my books to submit a paper to a 2009 Symposium Behavioiral Finance and Economics Research to be held here in Chicago Sept 23-25. I’m not sure I would have much to offer, but some of you surely would, both in terms of your prior work on PCT and economics. Part of the Call reads, “Theoretical and empirical…works that involve applications of psychology and neuroscience to all areas of financial decision making and practice under conditions of uncertainty…”

Have a look @ aobf.org.

Best,

Dick R.

···

----- Original Message -----
From: Bill Powers powers_w@FRONTIER.NET
Date: Thursday, May 7, 2009 10:23 am
Subject: Re: To know and to believe
To: CSGNET@LISTSERV.ILLINOIS.EDU

[From Bill Powers (2009.05.07.0904 MDT)]

Kenny Kitzke (2009.05.06.1915 EDT)]

KK: I think you missed my point. I was trying to propose that our knowledge and our beliefs (however we define or establish them) appear in HPCT as reference perceptions. You have a method for distinguishing which of your references you perceive as knowledge and which as belief. That’s fine. But, when it comes to your behavior according to PCT, it is the reference perception and not its origin that matters. I certainly believe that and think I know it. What do you observe?

I would say they are perceptions. The reference perception simply indicates how much of a perception I want to experience. The actual appearance of a perception is what I experience happening, regardless of what I would prefer that perception to be.

I think belief and knowledge are words I use to indicate how much weight I give to any perception at higher levels, whether it matches or differs from any reference value. The lowest weight is given to perceptions I am least sure about, the ones I say I “believe”. I would say I “believe” that the crossbar of a T is shorter than the vertical stroke even though I can see that it definitely looks shorter, because I know there is an illusion and I can’t remember which way it goes. After I measure the crossbar and the vertical stroke with a ruler, I can say I “know” they are equal in length as close as I can read the scale. When controlling things, I give the most importance – use the highest gain – to control things I am pretty sure about perceiving correctly (that is, in ways I can verify). If I only “believe” I am perceiving something, I don’t take apparent errors as seriously, nor do I rely on it even if it seems to be under control. These are all higher-level judgments about lower-level perceptions.

Best,

Bill P.

[From Bill Powers (2009.05.10.0650 MDT)]

Dick Robertson, 2009.05.07.1717CDT --

I'm having trouble keeping up with the list lately.

I looked up that aobf.org site. It really looks like another uphill battle since they're assuming a basically statistical approach instead of modeling. And it's all about "decision making," which in PCT comes down to conflict resolution. The idea of a miniconference is appealing, but at the moment I'm feeling tired and kind of glad that I don't have to go anywhere. If you went ahead and organized it I'd probably come. But I don't know about sticking my nose into a conference where the chances of a friendly reception look rather small.

Best,

Bill P.

[From Dick Robertson. 2009.05.09.1502CDT]

Thanks Bill, for taking the time. I know you are loaded down with this big thread on Schizophrenia.

[From Bill Powers (2009.05.10.0650 MDT)]

I looked up that aobf.org site. It really looks like another
uphill > battle since they’re assuming a basically statistical approach
instead of modeling. And it’s all about “decision making,” which in
PCT comes down to conflict resolution. The idea of a miniconference
is appealing, but at the moment I’m feeling tired and kind of
glad > that I don’t have to go anywhere. If you went ahead and organized it
I’d probably come. But I don’t know about sticking my nose into a
conference where the chances of a friendly reception look rather small.

You’re probably right about the expectation. Even the young man who is so-far enthusiatic about Perc of Reality (anyhow is a nephew of one of my daughters in law) told me, “It really is exciting to see the power of perception.” Oh, yeah, there is a way to go.

I’m thinking of trying to keep my contribution (if any) simple – that is to develop the contrast between looking at financial decisions as individuals controlling for realizing personal values (staying away from technical PCT as much as possible) – as against Kahneman and Tversky’s positing of how
human foibles of cognition interfere with being completely rational decision makers.

I don’t know if such a proposal will fly with the symposium leader, but if so I would hope at least to point the audience at the PCT work on conflict and on economics.

Best,

Dick R.