A Possible Practical Application of PCT

I've been re-reading portions of B:CP (again) - Chapters 12 through 17. In
going through them I noted a remark by Bill (that I can't find right now) to
the effect that memory research hasn't dealt with memory at the various
levels. That immediately set me to thinking about possible applications of
the results of such research if it could in fact be conducted.

First off, I don't have a clue as to how research into memory as a
multi-level (corresponding to PCT) would be conducted.

BUT, if it could, then large numbers of assessments could be conducted.

These assessments should reveal any patterns in the quality of memory at the
various levels of the hierarchy. I can speculate about at least nine basic
patterns that might be found.

If found, these patterns could then be correlated with other factors (e.g.,
job performance, aptitude, learning, types of thinkers (per Bill) etc.

Those correlations might play a role in things like hiring, assignment,
admissions, etc, etc.

Is that even remotely doable?

Regards,

Fred Nickols
Senior Consultant
Distance Consulting
nickols@att.net
www.nickols.us

"Assistance at a Distance"

[From Bill Powers (2006.06.29.1020 MDT)]
Fred Nickols (2006.06.29) --

First off, I don't have a clue as to how research into memory as a
multi-level (corresponding to PCT) would be conducted.

It would have to be organized around the proposed levels of perception. But I think that would be a little premature since the research to establish the reality of the proposed perceptual levels hasn't been done. It seems to me that there is fertile ground for graduate students in testing the proposed levels and modifying them or offering alternatives for testing. Once we're pretty sure that there are universal levels of perceptions, then we might get somewhere with seeing how people remember perceptions at different levels.

Best,

Bill P.

[From Fred Nickols (2006.06.29.1335 EDT)] --

Bill Powers (2006.06.29.1020 MDT)]
>Fred Nickols (2006.06.29) --

>First off, I don't have a clue as to how research into memory as a
>multi-level (corresponding to PCT) would be conducted.

It would have to be organized around the proposed levels of
perception. But I think that would be a little premature since the
research to establish the reality of the proposed perceptual levels
hasn't been done. It seems to me that there is fertile ground for
graduate students in testing the proposed levels and modifying them
or offering alternatives for testing. Once we're pretty sure that
there are universal levels of perceptions, then we might get
somewhere with seeing how people remember perceptions at different levels.

I understand that the hierarchy is theoretical. That said, it seems to me that the levels in that hierarchy have some substance whether or not they fit that theoretical framework. In other words, we might - without proving the existence of the hierarchy - gauge memory in relation to intensity, sensations, configurations, transitions, sequences, relationships, programs, principles and system concepts. There already exist some assessments of facial memory (the ability to recall faces), which is to my way of thinking an instance of configuration. It also seems to me that memorizing a string of nonsense syllables might qualify as a sequence.

So, while I would certainly agree that trying to assess memory in the context of the hierarchy is something that probably has to wait until the existence of that hierarchy is confirmed, it doesn't seem to me that we have to wait to gauge memory at some if not most of the currently theorized levels.

Then again, maybe I'm dead wrong. That wouldn't be new...

···

--
Regards,

Fred Nickols
Senior Consultant
Distance Consulting
nickols@att.net
www.nickols.us

"Assistance at A Distance"

[From Bill Powers (2006.06.29.1220 MDT)]

Fred Nickols (2006.06.29.1335 EDT) --

... we might - without proving the existence of the hierarchy - gauge memory in relation to intensity, sensations, configurations, transitions, sequences, relationships, programs, principles and system concepts. There already exist some assessments of facial memory (the ability to recall faces), which is to my way of thinking an instance of configuration. It also seems to me that memorizing a string of nonsense syllables might qualify as a sequence.

That may be the only practical approach. My dream, however,. has always been to try to get psychology out of that sort of mushy study and into real data-taking on a par with the hard sciences. After all, we seem to be able to do it with control processes. Unfortunately, we do it by sticking with simple behaviors and low-level variables. All the sexy studies are out of our reach, so it's hard to get people interested. Why would anyone want to study stick-wiggling? I actually think we could get into more interesting things rather quickly, but the foundations have to be laid first, and there has to be some fairly substantial support, not to mention researchers willing to do the plodding that is needed at first. Oh, well.

Best,

Bill P.

[JIM DUNDON 06.30.06.1140edt]

[From Bill Powers (2006.06.29.1020 MDT)]
Fred Nickols (2006.06.29) --

First off, I don't have a clue as to how research into memory as a
multi-level (corresponding to PCT) would be conducted.

It would have to be organized around the proposed levels of perception. But I think that would be a little premature since the research to establish the reality of the proposed perceptual levels hasn't been done. It seems to me that there is fertile ground for graduate students in testing the proposed levels and modifying them or offering alternatives for testing. Once we're pretty sure that there are universal levels of perceptions, then we might get somewhere with seeing how people remember perceptions at different levels.

Does the question "why" influence the process "how"?.
When I reflect on my own remembering of things it looks like there can be
various resons for my remembering and the process appears to be different.
Sometimes I need to recall and I do what appears to be scanning.
In some cases it seems automatic. In some cases there are things which
increase or decrease the motivation. Sometimes it is easier when not trying
than when trying. Sometimes a fear blocks remembering. Money seems
to help me remember.

Are there clear distinctions between long term and short term memory?

When I took the Dale Carnegie course years ago and we were asked to use
our experiences for talks, I noticed that generally the older a person was the further back
in time they seemed to go for the experience. Why?

Best,

JIM D

···

Best,

Bill P.

[From Bill Powers (2006.06.30.1045 MDT)]

JIM DUNDON 06.30.06.1140edt --\

Does the question "why" influence the process "how"?.
When I reflect on my own remembering of things it looks like there can be
various resons for my remembering and the process appears to be different.

That's a different question from the idea of levels of memory. Anyhow, reality has caught up with me and I have to sign off from this discussion and get my act together for going to China. I'm practicing a speech in Mandarin, and it is SLOW going. And I need business cards, and there are some little gifts to buy, and I have to iron some new shirts... I'm outta here.

Best,

Bill P.

···

Sometimes I need to recall and I do what appears to be scanning.
In some cases it seems automatic. In some cases there are things which
increase or decrease the motivation. Sometimes it is easier when not trying
than when trying. Sometimes a fear blocks remembering. Money seems
to help me remember.

Are there clear distinctions between long term and short term memory?

When I took the Dale Carnegie course years ago and we were asked to use
our experiences for talks, I noticed that generally the older a person was the further back
in time they seemed to go for the experience. Why?

Best,

JIM D

Best,

Bill P.

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