A Powerful Abstract

[From Fred Nickols (2015.04.04.0803 EDT)]

This morning I was rereading “Feedback: Beyond Behaviorism” in Living Control Systems and I decided to search and see if it was online anywhere. It’s not but the first listing Google gave me was at the National Institute for Health (NIH). It doesn’t present the article but it does have an abstract and I think it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT that I have ever read. Here’s the link http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4682961 and here’s the abstract::

Begin Abstract

Consistent behavior patterns are created by variable acts, and generally repeat only because detailed acts change. The accepted explanation of this paradox, that “cues” cause the changes, is irrelevant; it is unsupported by evidence, and incapable of dealing with novel situations. The apparent purposefulness of variations of behavioral acts can be accepted as fact in the framework of a control-system model of behavior. A control system, properly organized for its environment, will produce whatever output is required in order to achieve a constant sensed result, even in the presence of unpredictable disturbances. A control-system model of the brain provides a physical explanation for the existence of goals or purposes, and shows that behavior is the control of input, not output. A systematic investigation of controlled quantities can reveal an organism’s structure of control systems. The structure is hierarchical, in that some quantities are controlled as the means for controlling higher-order quantities. The output of a higher-order system is not a muscle force, but a reference level (variable) for a lower-order controlled quantity. The highest-order reference levels are inherited and are associated with the meta-behavior termed reorganization. When controlled quantities are discovered, the related stimulus-response laws become trivially predictable. Variability of behavior all but disappears once controlled quantities are known. Behavior itself is seen in terms of this model to be self-determined in a specific and highly significant sense that calls into serious doubt the ultimate feasibility of operant conditioning of human beings by other human beings.

End Abstract

This is definitely a “keeper”

Enjoy,

Fred Nickols, CPT

Distance Consulting LLC

Assistance at a Distance

The Knowledge Workers’ Tool Room

“Be sure you measure what you want.”

“Be sure you want what you measure.”

[From Rick Marken (2015.04.04.0925)]

···

Fred Nickols (2015.04.04.0803 EDT)–Â

Â

This morning I was rereading “Feedback: Beyond Behaviorismâ€? in Living Control Systems and I decided to search and see if it was online anywhere. It’s not but the first listing Google gave me was at the National Institute for Health (NIH). It doesn’t present the article but it does have an abstract and I think it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT that I have ever read. Here’s the link http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4682961 and here’s the abstract::

RM: Remarkable. The whole enchilada in one clear, concise paragraph. Nice find, Fred.Â

BestÂ

Rick

Â

Begin Abstract

**Â **

Consistent behavior patterns are created by variable acts, and generally repeat only because detailed acts change. The accepted explanation of this paradox, that “cues” cause the changes, is irrelevant; it is unsupported by evidence, and incapable of dealing with novel situations. The apparent purposefulness of variations of behavioral acts can be accepted as fact in the framework of a control-system model of behavior. A control system, properly organized for its environment, will produce whatever output is required in order to achieve a constant sensed result, even in the presence of unpredictable disturbances. A control-system model of the brain provides a physical explanation for the existence of goals or purposes, and shows that behavior is the control of input, not output. A systematic investigation of controlled quantities can reveal an organism’s structure of control systems. The structure is hierarchical, in that some quantities are controlled as the means for controlling higher-order quantities. The output of a higher-order system is not a muscle force, but a reference level (variable) for a lower-order controlled quantity. The highest-order reference levels are inherited and are associated with the meta-behavior termed reorganization. When controlled quantities are discovered, the related stimulus-response laws become trivially predictable. Variability of behavior all but disappears once controlled quantities are known. Behavior itself is seen in terms of this model to be self-determined in a specific and highly significant sense that calls into serious doubt the ultimate feasibility of operant conditioning of human beings by other human beings.

End Abstract

Â

This is definitely a “keeperâ€?

Â

Enjoy,

Â

Fred Nickols, CPT

Distance Consulting LLC

Assistance at a Distance

The Knowledge Workers’ Tool Room

“Be sure you measure what you want.â€?

“Be sure you want what you measure.â€?

Â

Â


Richard S. Marken, Ph.D.
Author of  Doing Research on Purpose
Now available from Amazon or Barnes & Noble

[From Ted Cloak (2015.04.04.1112 MDT)]

I recently learned about this article myself. That Bill published it in Science – in the same year as B:CP – was a big surprise.

Oddly enough, what Fred’s PubMed source calls the “abstract” is actually the “Summary” at the end of Bill’s article. And yes, it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT, in my opinion also.

I’m attaching a PDF.

Best

Ted

[From Fred Nickols (2015.04.04.0803 EDT)]

This morning I was rereading “Feedback: Beyond Behaviorism” in Living Control Systems and I decided to search and see if it was online anywhere. It’s not but the first listing Google gave me was at the National Institute for Health (NIH).
It doesn’t present the article but it does have an abstract and I think it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT that I have ever read. Here’s the link
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4682961 and here’s the abstract::

Begin Abstract

Consistent behavior patterns are created by variable acts, and generally repeat only because detailed acts change. The accepted explanation of this paradox, that “cues” cause the changes,
is irrelevant; it is unsupported by evidence, and incapable of dealing with novel situations. The apparent purposefulness of variations of behavioral acts can be accepted as fact in the framework of a control-system model of behavior. A control system, properly
organized for its environment, will produce whatever output is required in order to achieve a constant sensed result, even in the presence of unpredictable disturbances. A control-system model of the brain provides a physical explanation for the existence
of goals or purposes, and shows that behavior is the control of input, not output. A systematic investigation of controlled quantities can reveal an organism’s structure of control systems. The structure is hierarchical, in that some quantities are controlled
as the means for controlling higher-order quantities. The output of a higher-order system is not a muscle force, but a reference level (variable) for a lower-order controlled quantity. The highest-order reference levels are inherited and are associated with
the meta-behavior termed reorganization. When controlled quantities are discovered, the related stimulus-response laws become trivially predictable. Variability of behavior all but disappears once controlled quantities are known. Behavior itself is seen in
terms of this model to be self-determined in a specific and highly significant sense that calls into serious doubt the ultimate feasibility of operant conditioning of human beings by other human beings.

End Abstract

This is definitely a “keeper”

Enjoy,

Fred Nickols, CPT

Distance Consulting LLC

Assistance at a Distance

The Knowledge Workers’ Tool Room

“Be sure you measure what you want.”

“Be sure you want what you measure.”

Powers - Beyond Behaviorism 1973.pdf (1.19 MB)

[From Rick Marken (2015.04.04.1120)]

···

Ted Cloak (2015.04.04.1112 MDT)

Â

TC: I recently learned about this article myself. That Bill published it in Science – in the same year as B:CP – was a big surprise.

 RM: Thanks for the article Ted. But it is reprinted in LCS I.Â

BestÂ

Rick

Oddly enough, what Fred’s PubMed source calls the “abstract” is actually the “Summary” at the end of Bill’s article. And yes, it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT, in my opinion also.

I’m attaching a PDF.

Best

Ted

Â

[From Fred Nickols (2015.04.04.0803 EDT)]

Â

This morning I was rereading “Feedback: Beyond Behaviorismâ€? in Living Control Systems and I decided to search and see if it was online anywhere. It’s not but the first listing Google gave me was at the National Institute for Health (NIH).Â
It doesn’t present the article but it does have an abstract and I think it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT that I have ever read. Here’s the link
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4682961 and here’s the abstract::

Â

Begin Abstract

**Â **

Consistent behavior patterns are created by variable acts, and generally repeat only because detailed acts change. The accepted explanation of this paradox, that “cues” cause the changes,
is irrelevant; it is unsupported by evidence, and incapable of dealing with novel situations. The apparent purposefulness of variations of behavioral acts can be accepted as fact in the framework of a control-system model of behavior. A control system, properly
organized for its environment, will produce whatever output is required in order to achieve a constant sensed result, even in the presence of unpredictable disturbances. A control-system model of the brain provides a physical explanation for the existence
of goals or purposes, and shows that behavior is the control of input, not output. A systematic investigation of controlled quantities can reveal an organism’s structure of control systems. The structure is hierarchical, in that some quantities are controlled
as the means for controlling higher-order quantities. The output of a higher-order system is not a muscle force, but a reference level (variable) for a lower-order controlled quantity. The highest-order reference levels are inherited and are associated with
the meta-behavior termed reorganization. When controlled quantities are discovered, the related stimulus-response laws become trivially predictable. Variability of behavior all but disappears once controlled quantities are known. Behavior itself is seen in
terms of this model to be self-determined in a specific and highly significant sense that calls into serious doubt the ultimate feasibility of operant conditioning of human beings by other human beings.

End Abstract

Â

This is definitely a “keeper�

Â

Enjoy,

Â

Fred Nickols, CPT

Distance Consulting LLC

Assistance at a Distance

The Knowledge Workers’ Tool Room

“Be sure you measure what you want.�

“Be sure you want what you measure.�

Â

Â

Richard S. Marken, Ph.D.
Author of  Doing Research on Purpose
Now available from Amazon or Barnes & Noble

[From Ted Cloak (2015.04.04.1230 MDT)]

[From Rick Marken (2015.04.04.1120)]

Ted Cloak (2015.04.04.1112 MDT)

TC: I recently learned about this article myself. That Bill published it in Science -- in the same year as B:CP -- was a big surprise.

RM: Thanks for the article Ted. But it is reprinted in LCS I.

TC: So it is. I had forgotten that.

Best

Ted

Best

Rick

···

Oddly enough, what Fred's PubMed source calls the "abstract" is actually the "Summary" at the end of Bill's article. And yes, it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT, in my opinion also.

I'm attaching a PDF.

Best

Ted

[From Fred Nickols (2015.04.04.0803 EDT)]

This morning I was rereading “Feedback: Beyond Behaviorism� in Living Control Systems and I decided to search and see if it was online anywhere. It’s not but the first listing Google gave me was at the National Institute for Health (NIH). It doesn’t present the article but it does have an abstract and I think it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT that I have ever read. Here’s the link <Feedback: beyond behaviorism - PubMed and here’s the abstract::

***Begin Abstract***

Consistent behavior patterns are created by variable acts, and generally repeat only because detailed acts change. The accepted explanation of this paradox, that "cues" cause the changes, is irrelevant; it is unsupported by evidence, and incapable of dealing with novel situations. The apparent purposefulness of variations of behavioral acts can be accepted as fact in the framework of a control-system model of behavior. A control system, properly organized for its environment, will produce whatever output is required in order to achieve a constant sensed result, even in the presence of unpredictable disturbances. A control-system model of the brain provides a physical explanation for the existence of goals or purposes, and shows that behavior is the control of input, not output. A systematic investigation of controlled quantities can reveal an organism's structure of control systems. The structure is hierarchical, in that some quantities are controlled as the means for controlling higher-order quantities. The output of a higher-order system is not a muscle force, but a reference level (variable) for a lower-order controlled quantity. The highest-order reference levels are inherited and are associated with the meta-behavior termed reorganization. When controlled quantities are discovered, the related stimulus-response laws become trivially predictable. Variability of behavior all but disappears once controlled quantities are known. Behavior itself is seen in terms of this model to be self-determined in a specific and highly significant sense that calls into serious doubt the ultimate feasibility of operant conditioning of human beings by other human beings.

***End Abstract***

This is definitely a “keeper�

Enjoy,

Fred Nickols, CPT

<http://www.nickols.us/&gt;&gt; Distance Consulting LLC

Assistance at a Distance

<http://www.nickols.us/toolroom.html&gt;&gt; The Knowledge Workers’ Tool Room

“Be sure you measure what you want.�

“Be sure you want what you measure.�

--

Richard S. Marken, Ph.D.
Author of <http://www.amazon.com/Doing-Research-Purpose-Experimental-Psychology/dp/0944337554/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1407342866&sr=8-1&keywords=doing+research+on+purpose&gt;Doing Research on Purpose.

Now available from Amazon or Barnes & Noble

[From Fred Nickols (2015.04.04.1428 EDT)]

Thanks, Ted. In some ways this is downright funny. I was so taken with the “abstract” that I was thinking of contacting NIH to see if I could identify who wrote it. Turns out it was Bill. How fitting.

Fred Nickols

···

From: Ted Cloak (tcloak@unm.edu via csgnet Mailing List) [mailto:csgnet@lists.illinois.edu]
Sent: Saturday, April 04, 2015 2:13 PM
To: csgnet@lists.illinois.edu
Subject: RE: A Powerful Abstract

[From Ted Cloak (2015.04.04.1112 MDT)]

I recently learned about this article myself. That Bill published it in Science – in the same year as B:CP – was a big surprise.

Oddly enough, what Fred’s PubMed source calls the “abstract” is actually the “Summary” at the end of Bill’s article. And yes, it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT, in my opinion also.

I’m attaching a PDF.

Best

Ted

[From Fred Nickols (2015.04.04.0803 EDT)]

This morning I was rereading “Feedback: Beyond Behaviorism” in Living Control Systems and I decided to search and see if it was online anywhere. It’s not but the first listing Google gave me was at the National Institute for Health (NIH). It doesn’t present the article but it does have an abstract and I think it is one of the most powerful statements about PCT that I have ever read. Here’s the link http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4682961 and here’s the abstract::

Begin Abstract

Consistent behavior patterns are created by variable acts, and generally repeat only because detailed acts change. The accepted explanation of this paradox, that “cues” cause the changes, is irrelevant; it is unsupported by evidence, and incapable of dealing with novel situations. The apparent purposefulness of variations of behavioral acts can be accepted as fact in the framework of a control-system model of behavior. A control system, properly organized for its environment, will produce whatever output is required in order to achieve a constant sensed result, even in the presence of unpredictable disturbances. A control-system model of the brain provides a physical explanation for the existence of goals or purposes, and shows that behavior is the control of input, not output. A systematic investigation of controlled quantities can reveal an organism’s structure of control systems. The structure is hierarchical, in that some quantities are controlled as the means for controlling higher-order quantities. The output of a higher-order system is not a muscle force, but a reference level (variable) for a lower-order controlled quantity. The highest-order reference levels are inherited and are associated with the meta-behavior termed reorganization. When controlled quantities are discovered, the related stimulus-response laws become trivially predictable. Variability of behavior all but disappears once controlled quantities are known. Behavior itself is seen in terms of this model to be self-determined in a specific and highly significant sense that calls into serious doubt the ultimate feasibility of operant conditioning of human beings by other human beings.

End Abstract

This is definitely a “keeper”

Enjoy,

Fred Nickols, CPT

Distance Consulting LLC

Assistance at a Distance

The Knowledge Workers’ Tool Room

“Be sure you measure what you want.”

“Be sure you want what you measure.”