A Worked Example

[From Bruce Gregory (980424.1707 EDT)]

Here is an application of my understanding of HPCT applied to RTP. I would
be grateful to anyone who takes the time to point out the errors in my
thinking.

Children are hierarchical control systems. So are teachers. Sometimes the
former interfere with the efforts of the latter to exercise control. Since
hierarchical control systems resist interference with the efforts to
control, "disruptive" students pose a problem for teachers. The RTP process
is based on the assumption that remaining with their friends is a system
level controlled perception for most students. A disruptive student is
threatened with a major disturbance of this perception (being removed to the
room where he or she must work out a plan to re-enter the classroom). If the
unwanted behavior persists, this disturbance is applied. In order to regain
the control of the "with my buddies" perceptual variable, the system must
adjust the reference levels of lower level control systems. If it fails to
successfully make these adjustments, the student experiences continuing
large error signals and eventually is expelled. This process, unlike the one
I described in an earlier post, is humanistic.

All corrections appreciated.

Best Offer

[From Tim Carey (980425.0735)]

[From Bruce Gregory (980424.1707 EDT)]

Hi Bruce,

This is all pretty close to my understanding as well, so I too would be
interested in other's comments.

The only change I would make to what you've written concerns the sentence
below.

If it fails to
successfully make these adjustments, the student experiences continuing
large error signals and eventually is expelled.

Where RTP is most successfully implemented, my understanding is that school
personnel work really hard at being continually "invitational" to the kids
who are, at the moment, not controlling for whatever it takes to keep them
in the classroom. I don't know that being expelled is actually part of Ed's
program. In fact, the kids and/or their parents would be more likely to
"self-expel" if they didn't ever develop a "strong" reference for being in
class (in whatever form this might take).

Cheers,

Tim