ADD

The best book I've read on ADD (and I've read many ..... few good) is "Scattered Minds: a New Look at the Origins
and Healing of Arrention Deficit Disorder" by Gabor Mate 1999. He and his three children have ADD. I found his
basic approach quite consistent with PCT. I also discovered that I have a scattered mind. I have been unable to
decide just what to do with that insight at my age (69). Can I truly learn to go up a level? I'll let you know
in a year or so.

David Wolsk
Victoria, BC Canada

[From Norman Hovda (20000107.1230 MST)]

In "Driven to Distraction", the authors and attention deficit disorder
experts, Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. and John J. Ratey, M.D.,
describe ADD in the Preface. "The syndrome is not one of attention
deficit but of attention inconsistency".

In PCT terms, has anything ever been written on the subject?

BTW, Kent McClelland <mcclel@grinnell.edu> has another paper
entitled: "Perceptual Control and Social Power"

and can be found at URL:

http://www.ed.uiuc.edu/csg/people/mcclelland/PCSP/PCSP_ToC.ht
ml

enjoy,
nth

[From Rick Marken (2000.01.08.1200)]

Norman Hovda (20000107.1230 MST) --

In "Driven to Distraction", the authors and attention deficit
disorder experts, Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. and John J. Ratey,
M.D., describe ADD in the Preface. "The syndrome is not one of
attention deficit but of attention inconsistency".

In PCT terms, has anything ever been written on the subject?

My impression is that ADD (like all psychiatric categories)
is a name that is given to a set of superficially similar
behavior patterns that probably have little in common (from one
ADD catergorized person to another) in terms of PCT.

Best

Rick

···

--
Richard S. Marken Phone or Fax: 310 474-0313
Life Learning Associates e-mail: rmarken@earthlink.net
http://home.earthlink.net/~rmarken/

[From Richard Kennaway (20000008.0955 GMT)]

Norman Hovda (20000107.1230 MST):

In "Driven to Distraction", the authors and attention deficit disorder
experts, Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. and John J. Ratey, M.D.,
describe ADD in the Preface. "The syndrome is not one of attention
deficit but of attention inconsistency".

In PCT terms, has anything ever been written on the subject?

I don't know, but in political terms, it has been suggested that the
"inconsistency" is between what the child wants to pay attention to and
what the parents and school teachers want the child to pay attention to.

-- Richard Kennaway, jrk@sys.uea.ac.uk, http://www.sys.uea.ac.uk/~jrk/
   School of Information Systems, Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich, U.K.

I too am concerned about the politics of ADD, not to mention of other
school aggravated disorders, disabilities (or is that challenges?). Lots of
room here for complex analyses a la the application of PCT in understanding
social interactions. Related to which I'm just starting to read a Phil
Runkel pdf file that Dag must have shared some time ago; the topic "What is
a Sociologist to Do?" Nov, 1995.

Richard Kennaway wrote:

···

[From Richard Kennaway (20000008.0955 GMT)]

Norman Hovda (20000107.1230 MST):
>In "Driven to Distraction", the authors and attention deficit disorder
>experts, Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. and John J. Ratey, M.D.,
>describe ADD in the Preface. "The syndrome is not one of attention
>deficit but of attention inconsistency".
>
>In PCT terms, has anything ever been written on the subject?

I don't know, but in political terms, it has been suggested that the
"inconsistency" is between what the child wants to pay attention to and
what the parents and school teachers want the child to pay attention to.

-- Richard Kennaway, jrk@sys.uea.ac.uk, http://www.sys.uea.ac.uk/~jrk/
   School of Information Systems, Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich, U.K.

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[From Mike Acree (971205.1000 PST)]

Like Tim (971205.0610), I appreciated Bill's post (971204.0307) on ADD.
As I understand it, one of the principal tests for ADD is persistence
without too many errors in a particular tediously trivial task--just
like school, as Bill points out, except that it's for 20 minutes instead
of 12 years. I have very intelligent, high-functioning friends who, to
their own amazement, are utterly unable to pass this test. I have no
reason to believe that I wouldn't, but that doesn't seem anything to be
particularly proud of. Differing abilities, however, as I believe Bill
was implying in a later post (971205.09338), doesn't indicate that one
group or the other should be drugged. Some of these adult friends do
find medication helpful, but I was nevertheless pleased to see Tim
hinting at what one naturally suspects, that medicating children is
primarily for the benefit of the teachers rather than the students.
Forcing drugs on those who are handicapped by chronically hostile and
sarcastic attitudes might make life easier for the rest of us, too, but
would have about the same warrant.

Mike