BCT loop

The answer to something that has been troubling me has just dawned.
As Bill Powers pointed out, everything a person experiences he must
see, hear, feel, taste, or smell-- in short he must perceive. BCT
suggests that when a person does something to make him himself feel
good, he also completes a feed back loop. He does something to evoke
behavior in another person which he perceives and enjoys.

For example, he kisses a girl, looks into her eyes, feels her lips,
smells her perfume, hears her gasps of pleasure, all of which make him
feel good Loop one. So he kisses her again, enthusiastically. At that
point the girl's ex boy friend shows up and yells, "Hey you, knock it
off, That's my girl you're kissing, grabs his shoulder and starts to
pull him off. The man kissing the girl perceives this attack. It makes
him feel bad. So he punches the ex boy friend in the nose. He feels the
crunch of his fist connecting, sees the blood spurt, hears the gasp of
pain. He shouts angrily, "Get lost mister, or I'll knock your God Damned
head off . He sees the ex boy friend slink off. Doing all this gives him
pleasure. Loop Two.

How am I doing? Please challenge this version of BCT

jappel216.vcf (62 Bytes)

[From Rick Marken (990213.1040)]

John Appel (990212) --

BCT suggests that when a person does something to make him
himself feel good, he also completes a feed back loop. He does
something to evoke behavior in another person which he perceives
and enjoys.

OK. Though I think it's not quite right to say that someone
"completes a feedback loop" when he acts to evoke a behavior
he enjoys. The feedback loop is always in place; the person in
this loop is acting to control a perceptual variable (in this
case, a variable aspect of someone else's behavior, such as the
degree to which that person is smiling).

For example, he kisses a girl, looks into her eyes, feels her lips,
smells her perfume, hears her gasps of pleasure, all of which make
him feel good Loop one.

Actually there are several loops here because the lover is
apparently controlling several perceptual variables; the press
of the kiss, the sight of the eye, the feel of the lips, the
intensity of the scent of a woman, the sound of her sighs, etc.

So he kisses her again, enthusiastically.

This suggests that the perceptions you mention above (the kiss,
the glance, the feel, the scent, the sighs, etc) _cause_ the
lover to kiss the girl again. But this is not how a control loop
works. Actions (like kisses) are done to bring perceptions (like
kisses, sighs, glances, etc) to reference levels and protect them
from disturbance (like the other guy). The lover kisses in order
to produce and maintain the perceptions he wants; his kisses are
not really caused by the perceptions he gets.

The man kissing the girl perceives this attack. It makes him feel
bad. So he punches the ex boy friend in the nose.

Again, actions are not caused; they are part of a control of input
loop. The punch is an action aimed at protecting a perception
(kissing with the girl) from disturbance (the other guy who is
trying to keep you from kissing her).

How am I doing? Please challenge this version of BCT

I think you have to learn how a control loop works. I, of course,
recommend my demos at http://home.earthlink.net/~rmarken/demos.html.
I think the most important concept for you to understand is the
concept of a _controlled variable_. The actions of a person in a
control loop are not _caused_ by perceptions; they keep variable
aspects of the environment (the aspects of the environment that
are _perceived_) under control. The aspect of the environment
that is controlled by a control loop is called a _controlled
variable_.

Best

Rick

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--

Richard S. Marken Phone or Fax: 310 474-0313
Life Learning Associates e-mail: rmarken@earthlink.net
http://home.earthlink.net/~rmarken/