Behavior of Perception

[From Dag Forssell (920926)]

The first day of three went well. The customer is apparently enthused.
Now, I am preparing the last details for the third, technical day.

Behavior of Perception is the most comprehensive summary of HPCT and a
challenge both to portray and understand. It shows the integration of
perceptions and reference signals. You can see how "Perceptions"
"Behave".

I would very much like some help with suggestions on how to word and
illustrate this. Some of you may remember my presentation in Durango on
this. The time has come for me to produce (version one).

I think that a version focusing on vision would be of interest. Would you
like to help, Wayne? Here I will attempt to portray Kent's example in
his paper, relating to the cruise control. (As I do, I find I want to
take a stab at vision. This is much more detailed than Kent's narrative).

A year ago, the sequence of the levels was questioned. In this muscle/
motor example, I will show Intensity, Sensation, Transition and
Configuration. I believe that is appropriate. In the vision example, (see
Bill's post on levels of perception (920324.0300)), the regular sequence
Intensity, Sensation, Configuration and Transition makes more sense. Is
there any problem suggesting that there have evolved different level
functions for different purposes? Different numbers of levels? I would
think not.

The following diagram is my basic module:

          > Perception 1 | | Instruction |
          >________________| |__________________|
                  ^ ^ ^ |

···

----------------------------------------------------------------------
  ^ | | | ________________ |
  > > > > > Stored perc 3 | |
  > > > > _|______________ | |
  > > > > Store | Stored perc 2 |_| |
  > > > > signal 1 _|______________ | |
Level of | | | -------> | Stored |_| |
perception: | | | | perception 1 |<---------
As noted. | | | <------- |________________| output signal 1
  > > > > Imagine | //
  > > > > > // reference signals
  > > > > __vvv__
  > _____________|_ | | signal 1 | +++ | error signal
  > > Perception 3 || |---------->|- C =|------------------
  > > ____________||_ | |_______| |
  > >__| Perception 2 || |
  > > ____________||_ __________|______
  > >__| | | Output / |
  > > Perception 1 | | Instruction |
  > >_______________| |_________________|
  v ^ ^ ^ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > > > >
                                                       output signal 2

I: Motor Control example.

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 11; Systems Concept (I MOTOR CONTROL)
Output signal 1: Not applicable.
Stored perception 1: I am a successful entrepreneur
Stored perception 2: Customers benefit from my product
Stored perception 3: My work requires frequent travel
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1: N/A
Perception 2: N/A
Perception 3: N/A
Signal 1: N/A
Output: Provide memory address?
Output signal 2: Memory address?

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 10 Principle (I MOTOR CONTROL)
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: Face to face meetings create orders
Stored perception 2: I have informed this customer about product
Stored perception 3:
Error signal: Go to San Francisco
Perception 1: A customer wants to meet me in San Francisco
Perception 2: I am in Los Angeles
Perception 3: This can be a large order
Signal 1: See perception 1.
Output: Consider ways to get to S.F.
Output signal 2: Memory address

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 9; Program (I MOTOR CONTROL)
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: Get to S.F. by train/bus/walk: 12 hours
Stored perception 2: Get to S.F. by car. Walk from parking lot: 6 hours
Stored perception 3: Get to S.F. by Air / rental car / walk: 3 hours
Error signal: Not yet in San Francisco
Perception 1: Time is 12 noon
Perception 2: Customer wants to meet 4 pm
Perception 3: A plane is available
Signal 1: ?.
Output: Decide to Fly / drive / walk
Output signal 2: Memory address

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 8; Sequence (I MOTOR CONTROL)
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: Driving
Stored perception 2: Flying
Stored perception 3: Walking
Error signal: Driving on schedule?
Perception 1: Driving in progress
Perception 2: Flying completed
Perception 3: Walking ahead
Signal 1: See perception 1.
Output: Convert error to memory address
Output signal 2: Memory address

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 7; Category (I MOTOR CONTROL)
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: Passing
Stored perception 2: Being stuck behind car
Stored perception 3: Open road ahead
Error signal: To pass / pass completed
Perception 1: Passing
Perception 2: Road clear
Perception 3: Safe again See: II VISION 7;
Signal 1: See perception 1.
Output: Convert error to memory address
Output signal 2: Memory address

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 6; Relationship (I MOTOR CONTROL)
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: Passing car dynamics
Stored perception 2: Sounds / engine
Stored perception 3: Margins at this speed
Error signal: Passing progress
Perception 1: Pressing car forward
Perception 2: Passing car on right See: II VISION, 6; relationship
Perception 3: Clearances on all sides
Signal 1: See perception 1.
Output: Convert error to memory address
Output signal 2: Memory address

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 5; Event (I MOTOR CONTROL)
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: What driving posture feels like
Stored perception 2: What accelerating feels like
Stored perception 3: What looking alertly feels like
Error signal: Posture error
Perception 1: Pattern of leg posture
Perception 2: Pattern of body posture
Perception 3: Pattern of head posture
Signal 1: See perception 1.
Output: Convert error to memory address
Output signal 2: Memory address

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 4; Configuration Note: Motor control only.
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: Position
Stored perception 2: Posture
Stored perception 3:
Error signal: Position error
Perception 1: Position and orientation of this body part
Perception 2: Position and orientation of other body part
Perception 3: Position and orientation of other body part
Signal 1: See perception 1.
Output: Conversion / multiplier
Output signal 2: Velocity reference

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 3; Transition Note: Motor control only.
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: Velocity error
Perception 1: Velocity and direction in this body part
Perception 2: Velocity and direction in adjacent part
Perception 3: Squeeze on sole
Signal 1: See perception 1.
Output: Conversion / multiplier
Output signal 2: Acceleration reference

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 2; Sensation (I MOTOR CONTROL)
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: Acceleration error
Perception 1: Sense of force / acceleration from small muscle group
Perception 2: Signals from opposing muscles, working on same joint
Perception 3: Pressure on foot sole
Signal 1: See perception 1.
Output: Conversion / multiplier
Output signal 2: Tension reference signal

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 1; Intensity (I MOTOR CONTROL)
Output signal 1: See output signal 2 above.
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: Tension error
Perception 1: Muscle tension receptor: Tension
Perception 2: Muscle stretch receptor: Stretch
Perception 3: Adjacent muscle receptors: Tension & Stretch
Signal 1: Tension
Output: Conversion / multiplier
Output signal 2: Signal to muscle fiber: Contract.

ENVIRONMENT: ^ /
               > /
        _______|_______ ________v________ ________________
       > > > > > other |
       > variable |<---| action |--->| consequence |
       >_______________| |_________________| |________________|
               ^
               > environment
        _______|____________________________________________________
       > >
       > disturbance |
       >____________________________________________________________|

Variable: Muscle tension
Action: Contract muscle
Other consequence: Buildup of waste products, fatigue
Environment: Blood flow, tissues
Disturbance: Inertia, Foot pedal
-------------------------------------------------------------------
II: Vision example. (I top out at level 7).

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 11; Systems Concept (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1:
Perception 2:
Perception 3:
Signal 1: N/A
Output:
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 10 Principle (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1:
Perception 2:
Perception 3:
Signal 1: N/A
Output:
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 9; Program (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1:
Perception 2:
Perception 3:
Signal 1: N/A
Output:
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 8; Sequence (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1:
Perception 2:
Perception 3:
Signal 1: N/A
Output: N/A
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 7; Category (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1: Safe passing
Perception 2:
Perception 3:
Signal 1: N/A
Output: N/A
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 6; Relationship (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1: Passing car on your right
Perception 2: Oncoming car far away
Perception 3: In passing lane
Signal 1: N/A
Output: N/A
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 5; Event (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1: Passing car
Perception 2: Trees zooming by
Perception 3: Cars approaching in distance
Signal 1: N/A
Output: N/A
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 4; Transition (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1: Movement of needle
Perception 2: Sound of engine
Perception 3: Closing in on car in front
Signal 1: N/A
Output: N/A
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 3; Configuration (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1: Speedometer needle
Perception 2: Number
Perception 3: Red line
Signal 1: N/A
Output: N/A
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 2+; Picture elements (II VISION) - Needed level?
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1: Edge
Perception 2: Curve
Perception 3: Shading
Signal 1: N/A
Output: N/A
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 2; Sensation (II VISION)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1: Brown pixel
Perception 2: Black pixel
Perception 3: White pixel
Signal 1: N/A
Output: N/A
Output signal 2: N/A

LEVEL OF PERCEPTION: 1; Intensity (II VISION)
Output signal 1: N/A (perception only)
Stored perception 1: N/A
Stored perception 2: N/A
Stored perception 3: N/A
Error signal: N/A
Perception 1: Red sensitive cone: Red intensity
Perception 2: Green senstitive cone: Green intensity
Perception 3: Blue sensitive cone: Blue intensity
Perception 4: B/W sensitive rod: light intensity
Signal 1: N/A
Output: N/A
Output signal 2: N/A

ENVIRONMENT: ^
               >
        _______|_______
       > >
       > variable |
       >_______________|

Variable: Brown light

Suggestions for improvements are most welcome. Both on graphics and
wording. Perhaps a good way to suggest variations is to play the same
post back (or parts of it), substituting text in CAPS instead of the
lower case I have used. Our regular scheme for >quotations may not work
very well.

I'll be happy to mail good looking charts of the final result to those
deserving souls who help out.

As I labor on this, I get uncertain about the levels where I have placed
the different happenings of passing a car. Have I stretched this too
much?

Are the upper levels too loose? Should what I have labeled a sequence
better be at the program level?

I hope this will be a good start. Thanks for any help!

Dag Forssell
23903 Via Flamenco
Valencia, Ca 91355-2808
Phone (805) 254-1195 Fax (805) 254-7956
Internet: 0004742580@MCIMAIL.COM

[From Dag Forssell (920927-1)]

Bill Powers (920926.1900) In quick response to my diagrams:

...it takes the 11 levels as Gospel about 20 years prematurely.

I don't think you can just make up diagrams like this, not if you want
them to have any persuasive force. They have to be based on actual
personal experience, yours or someone else's, or they just won't be
convincing.

I really appreciate your quick feedback, before you went camping.

My wording for the upper levels was hasty (and sloppy), pressing against time
to post something for the sake of feedback. I had spent more time and felt
more comfortable with the lower levels.

My thinking now is to introduce the analysis of levels with guidance of your
post on levels of perception (920324.0300). (Any thoughts on my description
of the bottom levels of vision. We have never mentioned the three color
sensitivities of cones, but they are well documented).

I grant you that

Also, it doesn't (can't, really) capture the parallel nature of systems
at these levels, and the branching networks that underlie each system
at each level.

But this diagram can be supplemented by others (drawn to a smaller scale,
(such as LCS I: page 278) designed to convey the parallel and branching
nature of the model. I am working on that too.

This sort of example isn't too difficult to construct at the lower levels..

I would like to do just this, then leave the upper reaches blank. My post
yesterday will provide a start and a vehicle for communication on the net.
The net result for now is simply to scale back my ambition.

Any contributions, corrections and comments from other netters are solicited.
I will share the graphic result by snail mail on request, which will at least
look good and be suggestive of further research.

I agree that it is a good idea to leave the upper reaches blank, leaving them
to individual introspection.

For purposes of Vision/Mission statements, which are a leadership application
of PCT, I will be the first to suggest that people use the general concept
of layering, but use labels that make sense to themselves as they see fit.

As I see it now, suggested wording in the upper reaches may include:

System concept: Understanding
                      Belief
                      Vision

Principles: Principles
                      Values
                      Priorities
                      Mission
                      Standards

Programs: Action Plan

Sequences: Methods

By the time a person has created a statement for a business, using some of
this terminology, it will likely appear to have more layers than we talk
about in the model.

Leaving the upper reaches of the model blank invites people to think this
through and create layers of terminology that make sense to them.

Again, thanks for fast feedback, Bill.

Dag