Biased Random Walk Method and E Coli

[From Bill Powers (2007.02.02.0645 MST)]

Bo Wang (2007.02.01) --

This is a quote from a paper named "ROBUST VARIANCE REDUCTION FOR RANDOM WALK METHODS": Random walk methods are effective for solving linear partial differential equations in many dimensions, especially those involving complex geometries.

It's just what e coli is doing.

Thanks, Bo, that is useful information. I'll be very interested to hear more. Will your program run on a PC? If so, I hope you will demonstrate it and give a talk about it at the CSG meeting in July. I will bring my laptop and there will be a projection device to use with a large screen. I think there will also be high-speed internet connections available.

Your English is more than good, it is excellent -- but once in a while you seem to be using a word with a meaning I can't guess. I can't really complain, since my Chinese is a total failure, but perhaps you will enlighten me about what you mean by "cricket" and "convex" in the following:

I built a new programme these days with my "Physics lab"(The platform I showed my cricket). Some green balls evolve to chase a white convex.

"Cricket"is the name of a British ball game. It may also be a communication device (???). And "convex" is an adjective referring to a shape like the outside surface of a ball ("concave," the opposite of convex, would indicate the shape of the inside surface of a bowl).

Also, "shoal":

The whole looks like a shoal chasing crumbs.

The word "shoal" means a place in a lake or ocean where the bottom rises close to the surface. It is related to "shallow." I wonder if you might mean a "school" (of fish), pronounced "skool'. In this expression, "school" is used poetically to mean a "group" like a group of school children running around together.

PCT is truly becominbg an international science.

Best, (which is an abbreviation of "I send my best regards to you"),

Bill Powers

P.S. If I'm telling you things you already know, just smile and say "I know."

[From Richard Kennaway (2007.02.02.1421 GMT)]

[From Bill Powers (2007.02.02.0645 MST)]

I built a new programme these days with my "Physics lab"(The platform I showed my cricket). Some green balls evolve to chase a white convex.

"Cricket"is the name of a British ball game. It may also be a communication device (???). And "convex" is an adjective referring to a shape like the outside surface of a ball ("concave," the opposite of convex, would indicate the shape of the inside surface of a bowl).

Also, "shoal":

The whole looks like a shoal chasing crumbs.

The word "shoal" means a place in a lake or ocean where the bottom rises close to the surface. It is related to "shallow." I wonder if you might mean a "school" (of fish), pronounced "skool'. In this expression, "school" is used poetically to mean a "group" like a group of school children running around together.

In British English, a shoal of fish is the same thing as a school of fish, and a cricket is also a six-legged insect. But "convex" is still only an adjective.

-- Richard Kennaway

[From Bill Powers (2007.02.02.0735 MST)]

Richard Kennaway (2007.02.02.1421 GMT) --

In British English, a shoal of fish is the same thing as a school of fish, and a cricket is also a six-legged insect. But "convex" is still only an adjective.

And of course British English would prevail in Singapore where Bo Wang is.
Thank you. Now I understand why "school" is used -- my theory about "school children" is obviously just a bad guess. And I see I missed an interpretation of Bo's "The platform I showed my cricket." Change that to "with which I showed my cricket" and the insect meaning jumps right up and bites me.

It's good to have another programmer in the group, isn't it?

Best.

Bill P.

[From Bill Powers (2007.02.02.1125 MST)]

Bo Wang (2007.02.02) --

I'm not in Singapore and I have never been there before. I have no idea why you say so.

Because my memory is the size of a cricket. I think what I meant to say was Shanghai. If that's not right I shall have to stop guessing and ask.

Best,

Bill P.