Bill's gate (example of control by neural servo)

From Mervyn van Kuyen (971016 10:00 CET)

[From Bill Powers (971014.0734 MDT)]

Of course not by a single sensor. In PCT, single sensors belong to the
lowest level of perception and control, and even there they tend to
function in groups that sense the same physical variable (as many tendon
receptors sense the tension produced by a single muscle). At higher levels,
multiple input signals are processed by input functions whose output
signals represent more abstract variables, among which are such things as
distance. Distance is a continuous variable which is controlled by
continuously-variable muscle tensions and coordinated limb movements.

I was asking about what it received for input, not what it represented
at higher levels. Anyway, so you agree that what matters at the input
are large maps of inputs. Which I believe to be carrying discrete signals
(spikes).

I still think it would be informative if you were to describe how you would
explain, with your model, a control behavior such as steering a car to keep
it in its lane.

I have made an illustration and description of such a system at:
http://www.xs4all.nl/~mervyn/example.html

Regards,

Mervyn

PS This webpage does not explain another crucial mechanism -
the 'reliving mechanism' - which _is_ described in my paper at:
http://www.xs4all.nl/~mervyn/vankuyen.html

[From Bill Powers (971016.1010 MDT)]

Mervyn van Kuyen (971016 10:00 CET) --

I was asking about what it received for input, not what it represented
at higher levels. Anyway, so you agree that what matters at the input
are large maps of inputs. Which I believe to be carrying discrete signals
(spikes).

I treat them as continuous variables (frequencies of repetition).

I still think it would be informative if you were to describe how you would
explain, with your model, a control behavior such as steering a car to keep
it in its lane.

I have made an illustration and description of such a system at:
http://www.xs4all.nl/~mervyn/example.html

I get FILE NOT FOUND for that. This paper is not listed as a link in your
web page at /~mervyn. Another problem with case sensitivity?

Best,

Bill P.