Brain and Behavior: computation or not?

Your brain is not a computer:

https://aeon.co/essays/your-brain-does-not-process-information-and-it-is-not-a-computer

VS

Your brain is a indeed computer:

http://recursed.blogspot.co.uk/2016/05/yes-your-brain-certainly-is-computer.html?m=1

Both hold part of truth, yet missing the power of PCT to clarify misunderstandings.

Enjoy

Alex

[From Rick Marken (2016.05.22.1635)]

···

On Sun, May 22, 2016 at 7:40 AM, Alex Gomez-Marin agomezmarin@gmail.com wrote:

Your brain is not a computer:

https://aeon.co/essays/your-brain-does-not-process-information-and-it-is-not-a-computer

VS

Your brain is a indeed computer:

http://recursed.blogspot.co.uk/2016/05/yes-your-brain-certainly-is-computer.html?m=1

Both hold part of truth, yet missing the power of PCT to clarify misunderstandings.

Enjoy

Alex

RM: Thanks Alex. There is a paper in my book “More Mind Readings” (http://www.amazon.com/More-Mind-Readings-Methods-Purpose/dp/0944337430/) called “The Blind Men and the Elephant”. The elephant in the paper is the phenomenon of control. The blind men are the three ways the controlling done by living systems has been viewed in psychology and neuroscience: S-R, selection by consequences and calculated output. These are the views of the major schools of psychology: behaviorism, reinforcement theory and cognitive science. Each view is true – controlling really does look like each of these things; the paper in “More Mind Readings” explains why this is the case – but none of these descriptions tells the truth about what controlling is (just as the conclusions of the blind men in the fable were true descriptions of the aspect of the elephant that they felt but none was a true description of the elephant).

The moral of the story: Don’t try to build a true picture of an elephant (controlling) from the partially true descriptions of blind men (behavioral scientists who don’t know what control is).

Best regards

Rick

Richard S. Marken

Author, with Timothy A. Carey, of Controlling People: The Paradoxical Nature of Being Human.