Brain architecture

[From Bill Powers (961021.0600 MDT)]

Bill Benzon --

I've been trying to connect to www.newsavanna.com/wlb/ without any success.
Anything wrong with it? All I get is "host contacted, waiting for reply,"
and then a few minutes later a network error saying "socket not connected."
Do you know what a "socket" is, or if it's not connected, WHERE it's not
connected, and to what? I can contact other web pages.

"Newsavanna" is operated by a friend of mine and it is down occasionally.
Or there could be troubles between Palo Alto (where Newsavanna is
physically located) and you (though given the way the net is structured,
practially the whole world is between any two points). So keep trying. As
for a socket, don't know what one is, I've seen the message many many times
in many many places. It will go away.

-----------------------------

Good questions, but I've only got time for poor answers at the moment.

In your brain model, you say that the cerebral cortex is a "memory unit for
states in other units in the brain." Do you mean that this is ALL it is?

Yes, but that's quite alot.

Or
just that it contains, among other things, memory facilities in which might
be stored, among other things, states in other units in the brain? When you
say it stores "states," what sort of thing is a "state?"

Very good question.

What determines
when a state is to be stored, and what happens when a stored state is
retrieved?

2 more good questions. If the state of a stack unit is not stored in the
associated memory unit, then the system may well need to store that state
as a new perception/reference level. When a stored state is retrieved it
becomes an output signal/reference level in the operating stack.

Does your concept have any relation to the final model of a
control system unit with memory in B:CP (developed in Chapter 15)?

Yes it does. The states being stored are the states of units in the stack
(and the states of other memory units, depending on just where a particular
memory unit is located).

I'll try to give better answers later on today or this week.

···

********************************************************
William L. Benzon 518.272.4733
161 2nd Street bbenzon@global2000.net
Troy, NY 12180 http://www.newsavanna.com/wlb/
USA
********************************************************
What color would you be if you didn't know what you was?
That's what color I am.
********************************************************

[Bill Leach 961021.1448 EDT]

[From Bill Powers (961021.0600 MDT)]

I've been trying to connect to www.newsavanna.com/wlb/ without any
success. Anything wrong with it? All I get is "host contacted, waiting
for reply," and then a few minutes later a network error saying
"socket not connected." Do you know what a "socket" is, or if it's not
connected, WHERE it's not connected, and to what? I can contact other
web pages.

The "sockets" are the term for the structure and protocol for network
communication used on the internet (actually ALL of it, FTP, TelNet,
WWW, NIS, NFS, etc). The error message is of limited usefulness as it
provides no indication of why the socket is not connected. Some of the
possibles are, not enough sockets available on the server to which you
were trying to connect; you software asked for a socket that does not
exist on the server or is not available to your permission level, or one
of the two computers did not understand something that the other was
trying to do while attempting to establish the protocol to be used for
the session.

···

--
bill leach
b.leach@worldnet.att.net
ars KB7LX

[From Bill Powers (961021.0600 MDT)]

Bill Benzon --

I've been trying to connect to www.newsavanna.com/wlb/ without any success.
Anything wrong with it? All I get is "host contacted, waiting for reply,"
and then a few minutes later a network error saying "socket not connected."
Do you know what a "socket" is, or if it's not connected, WHERE it's not
connected, and to what? I can contact other web pages.

···

-----------------------------
In your brain model, you say that the cerebral cortex is a "memory unit for
states in other units in the brain." Do you mean that this is ALL it is? Or
just that it contains, among other things, memory facilities in which might
be stored, among other things, states in other units in the brain? When you
say it stores "states," what sort of thing is a "state?" What determines
when a state is to be stored, and what happens when a stored state is
retrieved? Does your concept have any relation to the final model of a
control system unit with memory in B:CP (developed in Chapter 15)?

Best,

Bill P.