"choice"

[From Chris Cherpas (980803.1016 PT)]

Bruce Gregory, Re: Test, coercion (980803.1148 EDT)--

...what we observe--choices being made without overt struggles.

I don't know if "what we observe" is self-evident
for me, and may not be for those to whom your
questions were addressed.

It is difficult to answer questions about "choice"
before the proposed phenomenon is sufficently well
defined to allow the design of potential experiments,
consider the outcomes, make predictions, etc., let
alone to consider what it would mean in terms of a
specific theory, i.e., PCT.

Regards,
cc

[From Bruce Gregory (980803.1609 EDT)]

Chris Cherpas (980803.1016 PT)

Bruce Gregory, Re: Test, coercion (980803.1148 EDT)--

>...what we observe--choices being made without overt struggles.

I don't know if "what we observe" is self-evident
for me, and may not be for those to whom your
questions were addressed.

It is difficult to answer questions about "choice"
before the proposed phenomenon is sufficiently well
defined to allow the design of potential experiments,
consider the outcomes, make predictions, etc., let
alone to consider what it would mean in terms of a
specific theory, i.e., PCT.

Here's a demonstration you can perform for yourself. Chocolate or vanilla,
choose one. Did you choose? If so you have data to begin to develop your own
definition. If you find yourself unable to choose, you have data that
supports the conflict model of choice. If there is insufficient information
to allow a description in terms of PCT, should be telling this to Rick and
Bill. They think there is a PCT model of choice.

Bruce Gregory

[From Chris Cherpas (980803.1353 PT)]

Bruce Gregory (980803.1609 EDT)--

Chocolate or vanilla, choose one... If you find yourself unable
to choose, you have data that supports the conflict model of choice.

I was unable to choose.

Regards,
cc

[From Bruce Gregory (98083.1750 EDT)]

Chris Cherpas (980803.1353 PT)]

Bruce Gregory (980803.1609 EDT)--
> Chocolate or vanilla, choose one... If you find yourself unable
> to choose, you have data that supports the conflict model of choice.

I was unable to choose.

There you go. You have no trouble accepting the PCT model. See how easy it
was? And you were convinced a lot more work was needed...

Bruce Gregory

[From Bill Powers (980803.1747 MDT)]

Bruce Gregory (980803.1609 EDT)--

Here's a demonstration you can perform for yourself. Chocolate or vanilla,
choose one. Did you choose? If so you have data to begin to develop your own
definition. If you find yourself unable to choose, you have data that
supports the conflict model of choice.

I looked in our refrigerator and found that Mary had chosen chocolate AND
vanilla. "Choice" seems to be whatever you do.

Best,

Bill P.