Graphical Model Simulating Internal Conflict between Control Systems?

Does anyone know of any graphical models of how internal control systems in conflict might be represented?

Thanks,

Andrew

[From Rick Marken (2014.03.04.1500)]

ConflictDiagram.png

···

On Tue, Mar 4, 2014 at 12:37 PM, Andrew Nichols anicholslcsw@gmail.com wrote:

Does anyone know of any graphical models of how internal control systems in conflict might be represented?

Hi Andrew

I’ve attached a diagram of a conflict between two control systems. The conflict exists when each system has a different reference for the same perceptual variable. That is, the conflict exists when the perceptual functions, k.i1 and k.i2 compute the same of very similar perceptions based on the same environmental quantity, q.i. For example, if q.o is two variables, x and y, then if p1 = x+y and p2 = x+y there will be conflict because you can’t get the same perception to be in two different states at the same time. If, however, p1 = x+y and p2 = x-y then there is no conflict. So a conflict really results when two control systems try to get the same perception of the outside world to two different reference states.

Best

Rick


Richard S. Marken PhD
www.mindreadings.com
The only thing that will redeem mankind is cooperation.
– Bertrand Russell

Thanks for that, Rick!

As usual, you are a very responsive control system :slight_smile:

Andrew

···

On Tue, Mar 4, 2014 at 5:00 PM, Richard Marken rsmarken@gmail.com wrote:

[From Rick Marken (2014.03.04.1500)]

On Tue, Mar 4, 2014 at 12:37 PM, Andrew Nichols anicholslcsw@gmail.com wrote:

Does anyone know of any graphical models of how internal control systems in conflict might be represented?

Hi Andrew

I’ve attached a diagram of a conflict between two control systems. The conflict exists when each system has a different reference for the same perceptual variable. That is, the conflict exists when the perceptual functions, k.i1 and k.i2 compute the same of very similar perceptions based on the same environmental quantity, q.i. For example, if q.o is two variables, x and y, then if p1 = x+y and p2 = x+y there will be conflict because you can’t get the same perception to be in two different states at the same time. If, however, p1 = x+y and p2 = x-y then there is no conflict. So a conflict really results when two control systems try to get the same perception of the outside world to two different reference states.

Best

Rick

Richard S. Marken PhD
www.mindreadings.com
The only thing that will redeem mankind is cooperation.
– Bertrand Russell

[From Rick Marken (2014.03.04.1720)]

···

On Tue, Mar 4, 2014 at 4:20 PM, Andrew Nichols anicholslcsw@gmail.com wrote:

Thanks for that, Rick!

As usual, you are a very responsive control system :slight_smile:

RM: It just looks that way (behavioral illusion) because I am controlling for communicating PCT;-) But I know that “responsive” is just a manner of expression, like “sunrise”; which should be “horizon fall”, since we now know that it’s the earth, not the sun, that moves (just as we now know that people control, they don’t respond;-)

Anyway, I reread my post and saw a small (but important) error where I said:

That should read :

For example, if q.i is two variables, x and y,

Best

Rick


Richard S. Marken PhD

www.mindreadings.com
The only thing that will redeem mankind is cooperation.
– Bertrand Russell

For example, if q.o is two variables, x and y,