LCSIII Demos for Linux

[From Adam Matic 2014.02.06.2250. CET]

If anyone is interested, here is a version of the LCSIII demos ported to Lazarus and compiled for Linux. You can download it here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/70399093/LCSIIILinux.zip

Big thanks to Matti Kolu for helping test and debug them.

Lazarus was supposed to be a write-once-compile-anywhere type of language. While these programs can be compiled on Windows and Linux machines, only some of them can be compiled to work good on a Mac.

I’m learning some JavaScript, as that seems to be the best option for future versions of PCT demos - as Matti mentioned, it works in practically all browsers, which means all OS-s. There are a bunch of these libraries for graphics, data graphs, user interfaces, so development should be relatively fast. I’m looking into using jQuery and it’s plugins with the processing.js library. Something like this: http://joseph-harrington.com/2012/03/controlling-processingjs-jqueryui/

Adam

[From Bruce Abbott (2014.02.07.0940 EST)]

Adam Matic 2014.02.06.2250. CET –

AM: If anyone is interested, here is a version of the LCSIII demos ported to Lazarus and compiled for Linux. You can download it here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/70399093/LCSIIILinux.zip

Big thanks to Matti Kolu for helping test and debug them.

Thanks, Adam; I appreciate the work you and Matti put into getting this right!

AM: Lazarus was supposed to be a write-once-compile-anywhere type of language. While these programs can be compiled on Windows and Linux machines, only some of them can be compiled to work good on a Mac.

I’m told, however, that the original demos will work on a Mac running PC emulation software.

AM: I’m learning some JavaScript, as that seems to be the best option for future versions of PCT demos - as Matti mentioned, it works in practically all browsers, which means all OS-s. There are a bunch of these libraries for graphics, data graphs, user interfaces, so development should be relatively fast. I’m looking into using jQuery and it’s plugins with the processing.js library. Something like this: http://joseph-harrington.com/2012/03/controlling-processingjs-jqueryui/

That looks like it might be the way to go. I tried Java a couple of years ago but found that the physics demos I was using as tutorials used some methods that were being discounted and presumably would disappear from later versions of Java.

I downloaded Processing a few weeks ago when Martin Taylor first mentioned it but the sketch window would not appear. I haven’t taken the time yet to determine the cause.

Bruce

[From Kent McClelland (2014.02.07.0850 CST)]
Bruce is correct in noting that the original LCS III demos will run OK on a Mac with emulation software. I've been able to run them on my Mac with a Parallels Desktop emulator. Using Parallels is a bit clumsy, however, and a version that runs on an Internet browser will be a welcome development.
Kent

[From Bruce Abbott (2014.02.07.0940 EST)]

Adam Matic 2014.02.06.2250. CET --

AM: If anyone is interested, here is a version of the LCSIII demos ported to Lazarus and compiled for Linux. You can download it here: <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/70399093/LCSIIILinux.zip>https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/70399093/LCSIIILinux.zip
Big thanks to Matti Kolu for helping test and debug them.

Thanks, Adam; I appreciate the work you and Matti put into getting this right!

AM: Lazarus was supposed to be a write-once-compile-anywhere type of language. While these programs can be compiled on Windows and Linux machines, only some of them can be compiled to work good on a Mac.

I’m told, however, that the original demos will work on a Mac running PC emulation software.

AM: I'm learning some JavaScript, as that seems to be the best option for future versions of PCT demos - as Matti mentioned, it works in practically all browsers, which means all OS-s. There are a bunch of these libraries for graphics, data graphs, user interfaces, so development should be relatively fast. I'm looking into using jQuery and it's plugins with the processing.js library. Something like this: <http://joseph-harrington.com/2012/03/controlling-processingjs-jqueryui/>http://joseph-harrington.com/2012/03/controlling-processingjs-jqueryui/

That looks like it might be the way to go. I tried Java a couple of years ago but found that the physics demos I was using as tutorials used some methods that were being discounted and presumably would disappear from later versions of Java.

I downloaded Processing a few weeks ago when Martin Taylor first mentioned it but the sketch window would not appear. I haven’t taken the time yet to determine the cause.

Bruce

[From Adam Matic 2014.02.7.1700 CET]

Bruce Abbott (2014.02.07.0940 EST)

That looks like it might be the way to go. I tried Java a couple of years ago but found that the physics demos I was using as tutorials used some methods that were being discounted and presumably would disappear from later versions of Java.

Well, JavaScript is actually very different from Java, and they are unrelated even though the name would suggest differently. There is only superficial similarity in syntax. Processing, on the other hand, is very closely related to Java, and it can be compiled to Java or to JavaScript using the processing.js library. The whole process is not very straightforward, but I think they should produce decent simulations.
Adam