Literary Criticism & PCT

[From L.H. LaRue, 93.10.19@1330 EDT]

Perhaps the group will be interested in a reference to a literary
critic who has cited Bill Powers. His name is Norman N. Holland.
Holland wants to like literary theory to more general theories about
human psychology, especially those about reading and other
perceptions, and he uses the "negative feedback loop" to explain.
Whether he gets it right or not, your deponent saith not; I am still
too much of a newcomer to the field to make a judgment. But for the
aid of those who are interested and more competent than I, the
following citations may be appropriate.

"The Brain of Robert Frost" (Routledge, 1988). The book is
relatively short (181 pages of text), and it is clearly written. He
does most of his theoretical work with feedback loops in Chapters 5 &
6. If you check out the index, you will see that he mentions Powers
only briefly and in passing in the text proper, but if you follow the
index entries into the footnotes, you will see a more thorough
acknowledgement.

"The I" (Yale, 1985). This book is long and rather dense; unlike
"Brain," it is not an easy read. However, it is cited in "Brain" as
the earlier book in which he works out the details that he only
reports on in the latter book. In "The I," Holland cites Powers, and
he discusses his work at length. Chapter 6 of "The I" is entitled "A
Model of Mind" (pp. 128-155), and it is devoted almost entirely to
expounding "Behavior: The Control of Perception" and relating the
ideas of Powers to others.

But I repeat the caveat noted above; there is no warranty on my part
that Holland gets it right. I would be interested to know if others
think that he does.

Best wishes,

Lewis Henry LaRue
Washington and Lee University
School of Law
Lexington, VA 24450

e-mail address: LHL@FS.LAW.WLU.EDU
telephone: 703-463-8513

From Tom Bourbon [931019.1344]

[From L.H. LaRue, 93.10.19@1330 EDT]

Perhaps the group will be interested in a reference to a literary
critic who has cited Bill Powers. His name is Norman N. Holland.

. . .

"The Brain of Robert Frost" (Routledge, 1988). The book is
relatively short (181 pages of text), and it is clearly written. He
does most of his theoretical work with feedback loops in Chapters 5 &
6. If you check out the index, you will see that he mentions Powers
only briefly and in passing in the text proper, but if you follow the
index entries into the footnotes, you will see a more thorough
acknowledgement.

"The I" (Yale, 1985). This book is long and rather dense; unlike
"Brain," it is not an easy read. However, it is cited in "Brain" as
the earlier book in which he works out the details that he only
reports on in the latter book. In "The I," Holland cites Powers, and
he discusses his work at length. Chapter 6 of "The I" is entitled "A
Model of Mind" (pp. 128-155), and it is devoted almost entirely to
expounding "Behavior: The Control of Perception" and relating the
ideas of Powers to others.

But I repeat the caveat noted above; there is no warranty on my part
that Holland gets it right. I would be interested to know if others
think that he does.

Thank you for the citations. Some of us keep an eye out for citations and
discussions of PCT wherever they occur. I will try to locate the Holland
books.

Did you have a chance to read the manuscripts by Hugh Gibbons, on PCT and
the law? If you did, I (and I am sure some others) would be interested in
your thoughts about that work.

Until later,

Tom