Perception vs Reality

[From Fred Nickols (2016.07.05.1618 ET)]

The comments regarding my “Control of Performance” posting prompt a different line of discussion.

This morning, I brewed a pot of coffee, poured a cup and sat down in the living room, placing the cup of coffee on a table next to my chair. Shortly afterward, I picked up the cup of coffee, raised it to my lips and took a sip.

I am perfectly happy and willing to say that I controlled the movement of the coffee cup from the table top to my lips. I am also perfectly willing and happy to say that I did so as a consequence of perceiving the movement of the cup from the table to my lips and its touch on my lips which signaled its arrival there. I am also happy to say that I controlled my perception of said movement. I’m also happy to say that I controlled taking a sip of coffee. Lastly, I’m happy to say that I controlled my coffee-drinking performance.

My understanding of the word “control” as a verb – in PCT and in my fire control days – is that it means to make something line up with the way you want or intend for it to be. The fact that all I know of the world I know by way of my perceptions doesn’t change that one whit.

Where am I going astray?

Regards,

Fred Nickols, CPT

Writer & Consultant

DISTANCE CONSULTING LLC

“Assistance at a Distance”SM

www.nickols.us/SeaStories.html

[From Rick Marken (2016.07.05.1610)]

···

Fred Nickols (2016.07.05.1618 ET)–

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FN: The comments regarding my “Control of Performanceâ€? posting prompt a different line of discussion.

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FN: This morning, I brewed a pot of coffee, poured a cup and sat down in the living room, placing the cup of coffee on a table next to my chair. Shortly afterward, I picked up the cup of coffee, raised it to my lips and took a sip.

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FN: I am perfectly happy and willing to say that I controlled the movement of the coffee cup from the table top to my lips. I am also perfectly willing and happy to say that I did so as a consequence of perceiving the movement of the cup from the table to my lips and its touch on my lips which signaled its arrival there. I am also happy to say that I controlled my perception of said movement. I’m also happy to say that I controlled taking a sip of coffee. Lastly, I’m happy to say that I controlled my coffee-drinking performance.

RM: And I’m happy that you would be happy to say that, although I think it would be clearer if you said that you controlled the perception of your coffee-drinking – which I would say is an event perception, much like a golf swing (an example Powers uses somewhere, possibly in B:CP) or shooting a free throw. The problem with saying that you controlled your coffee-drinking performance (or coffee-drinking behavior) is that you might be heard as saying that you controlled the outputs that an observer sees as coffee-drinking. That’s why we avoid saying “behavior is controlled” or “performance is controlled”; because it sounds like we are talking about control of output. But people obviously do control their performances – people like dancers, athletes, actors, musicians, etc. But what they are controlling are perceptions of events – like plié, pitch, soliloquy, phrase – that are perceptions of their own behavior from their own point of view. Â

RM: Actually, the part of your paragraph that I don’t like that much is where you say: Â “I am also perfectly willing and happy to say that I did so as a consequence of perceiving the movement of the cup from the table to my lips and its touch on my lips which signaled its arrival there”. What you do is not a consequence of perceiving nor does perception “signal” anything. You control for perceiving the movement of the cup and the touch of the cup to your lips. And you control those perceptions as the means of controlling for the perception of the event: drinking a cup of coffee.Â

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 FN: My understanding of the word “controlâ€? as a verb – in PCT and in my fire control days â– is that it means to make something line up with the way you want or intend for it to be. The fact that all I know of the world I know by way of my perceptions doesn’t change that one whit.

RM: Yes, and don’t forget that an important part of control is acting in whatever way is necessary to make something line up with the way you want it to be. It’s getting what you want in the face of disturbances that distinguishes control from other kinds of apparent goal oriented behavior, like that of a mass on a spring, a pendulum or iron filings moving to a magnet.Â

BestÂ

Rick

 Where am I going astray?

Â

Regards,

Â

Fred Nickols, CPT

Writer & Consultant

DISTANCE CONSULTING LLC

“Assistance at a Distanceâ€?SM

www.nickols.us/SeaStories.html

Â


Richard S. MarkenÂ

“The childhood of the human race is far from over. We
have a long way to go before most people will understand that what they do for
others is just as important to their well-being as what they do for
themselves.” – William T. Powers

Rick,

you are again changing your mind as many times before. Now everybody can see what I was talking about, when I said how confused person you are. I noticed this thread to Fred after I wrote my answer to your »confused« thread.

My answers are in text below.

···

From: Richard Marken [mailto:rsmarken@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 1:11 AM
To: csgnet@lists.illinois.edu
Subject: Re: Perception vs Reality

[From Rick Marken (2016.07.05.1610)]

Fred Nickols (2016.07.05.1618 ET)–

FN: The comments regarding my “Control of Performance� posting prompt a different line of discussion.

FN: This morning, I brewed a pot of coffee, poured a cup and sat down in the living room, placing the cup of coffee on a table next to my chair. Shortly afterward, I picked up the cup of coffee, raised it to my lips and took a sip.

FN: I am perfectly happy and willing to say that I controlled the movement of the coffee cup from the table top to my lips. I am also perfectly willing and happy to say that I did so as a consequence of perceiving the movement of the cup from the table to my lips and its touch on my lips which signaled its arrival there. I am also happy to say that I controlled my perception of said movement. I’m also happy to say that I controlled taking a sip of coffee. Lastly, I’m happy to say that I controlled my coffee-drinking performance.

RM: And I’m happy that you would be happy to say that, although I think it would be clearer if you said that you controlled the perception of your coffee-drinking – which I would say is an event perception, much like a golf swing (an example Powers uses somewhere, possibly in B:CP) or shooting a free throw. The problem with saying that you controlled your coffee-drinking performance (or coffee-drinking behavior) is that you might be heard as saying that you controlled the outputs that an observer sees as coffee-drinking. That’s why we avoid saying “behavior is controlled” or “performance is controlled”; because it sounds like we are talking about control of output. But people obviously do control their performances – people like dancers, athletes, actors, musicians, etc. But what they are controlling are perceptions of events – likeplié, pitch, soliloquy, phrase – that are perceptions of their own behavior from their own point of view.

HB : Increadible. How could you change your mind so fast. Just few hours ago your vision of PCT was clearly different (behavioristic). It was RCT. But now everybody can see the difference between PCT and RCT. This is PCT.

RM: Actually, the part of your paragraph that I don’t like that much is where you say: “I am also perfectly willing and happy to say that I did so as a consequence of perceiving the movement of the cup from the table to my lips and its touch on my lips which signaled its arrival there”. What you do is not a consequence of perceiving nor does perception “signal” anything. You control for perceiving the movement of the cup and the touch of the cup to your lips. And you control those perceptions as the means of controlling for the perception of the event: drinking a cup of coffee.

HB : Well again. How could you change your mind so quickly ?

FN: My understanding of the word “controlâ€? as a verb – in PCT and in my fire control days – is that it it means to make something line up with the way you want or intend for it to be. The fact that all I know of the world I know by way of my perceptions doesn’t change that one whit.

RM: Yes, and don’t forget that an important part of control is acting in whatever way is necessary to make something line up with the way you want it to be. It’s getting what you want in the face of disturbances that distinguishes control from other kinds of apparent goal oriented behavior, like that of a mass on a spring, a pendulum or iron filings moving to a magnet.

HB : Impresive. How about staying at this understanding of PCT ?

Best,

Boris

Best

Rick

Where am I going astray?

Regards,

Fred Nickols, CPT

Writer & Consultant

DISTANCE CONSULTING LLC

“Assistance at a Distance�SM

www.nickols.us/SeaStories.html

Richard S. Marken

“The childhood of the human race is far from over. We have a long way to go before most people will understand that what they do for others is just as important to their well-being as what they do for themselves.” – William T. Powers