Russian roulette

[From Bruce Abbott (970815.1420 EST)]

Bruce Gregory (970815.1245) --

When you get time, I'd appreciate an answer to the following
question. A loaded pistol establishes a relationship between
firing a bullet and pulling the trigger. Presumably this
relationship is important for people who want to shoot and
unimportant for those who do not. Putting only one bullet
in in the cylinder and spinning the cylinder establishes an
intermittent relationship between pulling the trigger and firing
the gun -- a connection that makes Russian Roulette feasible, if
not desirable. What does this schedule of reinforcement tell us
about the likelihood that you or I will take up Russian Roulette?

Only take a moment, so O.K., I'll answer now. It's not a schedule of
reinforcement, because you haven't identified any reinforcer. Thought you'd
get me with a trick question, you sly dog you.

Regards,

Bruce

[From Bruce Gregory (970815.1525 EDT)]

Bruce Abbott (970815.1420 EST)

Only take a moment, so O.K., I'll answer now. It's not a schedule of
reinforcement, because you haven't identified any reinforcer. Thought you'd
get me with a trick question, you sly dog you.

But people _do_ play Russian Roulette (or so I'm told). They
pull the trigger and the trigger is linked to the outcome. So
_something_ should be reinforcing, no?

Bruce