Selection of consequences

[From Rick Marken (970115.0915)]

For those of you with access to Java enabled browsers, I have
completed another demo (on "Selection of consequences": the
notorious E. coli demo) and made it available at my demo site:

http://www.leonardo.net/Marken/demos.html

I have also made the Java source for this demo avaiable because
I think it provides a nice framework that can be used by others
who want to write their own Java demos or experiments.

Again, comments or suggestions would be appreciated.

Best

Rick

[From Rick Marken (941031.1000)]

Bill Powers (941031.0700 MST) to Bruce Abbott (941030.1700 EST) - -

Wonderful post. As you note, Bruce's model is a control model, controlling
the input variable, dNut. The crucial point, which you describe so well, is
that:

It isn't dNut that determines where the drop in tumbling rate will
occur, but the reference signal.

So dNut (a consequence of tumbling) doesn't select behavior (tumbling or
not); it is selected by behavior (at least, in the region of dNut where there
is control). In Bruce's control model (which is similar to the one Bill and I
used in our analysis of the E. coli effect with people) dNut does not act as
a reinforcement (if a reinforcement is something that strengthen's or, at
least, affects the behavior that produces it); it is a controlled perceptual
variable.

So, is this the way reinforcement works. Bruce? And, if so, why aren't EAB
researchers talking more about reinforcement as controlled perceptual input?

Best

Rick