Self-Identification of References + Buddhism

[From Fred Nickols (2016.03.15.1111)]

I like this notion, Richard. Looks very promising.

Fred Nickols

···

From: richardpfau4153@aol.com [mailto:richardpfau4153@aol.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2016 10:28 AM
To: csgnet@lists.illinois.edu
Subject: Self-Identification of References + Buddhism

[From Richard Pfau (2016.03.15 10:27 DST)]

Self-Identification of References

Among other things when reading Marken and Carey’s book Controlling People (2015), I found statements such as the following especially though-provoking and helpful as a way of identifying my own references:

· “Whenever we are feeling irascible or out of sorts, it can pay big dividends to reflect on the controlling we are doing at that particular time.� (p. 149)

This led me to develop and use the following rule of thumb that might be called:

The Irritation Test for Identifying References


When you are irritated or upset by something, use PCT to identify why you are irritated. Your irritation indicates that some reference is being violated and an error signal is being produced. Think, “What is that reference?� and try to identify the reference or references involved.

I’ve used this approach several times and it seems to work. When irritated, by using the above-mentioned rule of thumb to apparently identify and become mindful of the major reference leading to my irritation, I came to both know myself better and put what was occurring into a perspective that helped me better deal with what I was feeling and doing.

Doing so also leads me to suggest the following way that knowledge of PCT might benefit Buddhist and other mindfulness practitioners around the world.

A PCT Linkage to Buddhist Thought

By bringing attention to the concept of references and control systems, PCT may help Buddhist and other mindfulness practitioners become aware of their attachments and how those attachments affect their feelings of suffering and well-being.Â

A basic Buddhist view is that “the origin of suffering is attachment and the ignorance thereof.â€? Since attachment (i.e., craving/desire/greed/…) is apparently linked so intimately to one’s references, the knowledge that PCT imparts can help people realize the processes behind their attachments, resulting feelings, and behavior. That is, we are attached to our references (a truism?) and that attachment leads to suffering when our perceptions differ from our references and “errorâ€? is produced.

In other words, PCT can apparently assist Buddhist understanding, the dispelling of “ignorance,� and the reduction of suffering by helping to make Buddhist mindfulness practitioners aware of PCT concepts and techniques such as The Irritation Test for Identifying References to identify their attachments/references and become aware of the body’s natural processes that lead to “error’ and suffering.

[From Rick Marken (2016.03.15.1130)]

Richard Pfau (2016.03.15 10:27 DST)

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RP: Self-Identification of References

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RP: Among other things when reading Marken and Carey’s book Controlling People (2015), I found statements such as the following especially though-provoking and helpful as a way of identifying my own references:

Â

·      “Whenever we are feeling irascible or out of sorts, it can pay big dividends to reflect on the controlling we are doing at that particular time.� (p. 149)

Â

RP: This led me to develop and use the following rule of thumb that might be called:

Â

The Irritation Test for Identifying References

Â

RP: When you are irritated or upset by something, use PCT to identify why you are irritated. Your irritation indicates that some reference is being violated and an error signal is being produced. Think, “What is that reference?� and try to identify the reference or references involved.

Â

RP: I’ve used this approach several times and it seems to work. When irritated, by using the above-mentioned rule of thumb to apparently identify and become mindful of the major reference leading to my irritation, I came to both know myself better and put what was occurring into a perspective that helped me better deal with what I was feeling and doing.

RM: This is a great idea; it's "going up a level" and it does work very nicely.Â
BestÂ
RickÂ
 >

···

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Doing so also leads me to suggest the following way that knowledge of PCT might benefit Buddhist and other mindfulness practitioners around the world.

Â

A PCT Linkage to Buddhist Thought

Â

By bringing attention to the concept of references and control systems, PCT may help Buddhist and other mindfulness practitioners become aware of their attachments and how those attachments affect their feelings of suffering and well-being.Â

Â

A basic Buddhist view is that “the origin of suffering is attachment and the ignorance thereof.â€? Since attachment (i.e., craving/desire/greed/…) is apparently linked so intimately to onee’s references, the knowledge that PCT imparts can help people realize the processes behind their attachments, resulting feelings, and behavior. That is, we are attached to our references (a truism?) and that attachment leads to suffering when our perceptions differ from our references and “errorâ€? is produced.

Â

In other words, PCT can apparently assist Buddhist understanding, the dispelling of “ignorance,� and the reduction of suffering by helping to make Buddhist mindfulness practitioners aware of PCT concepts and techniques such as The Irritation Test for Identifying References to identify their attachments/references and become aware of the body’s natural processes that lead to “error’ and suffering.

--
Richard S. MarkenÂ
Author, with Timothy A. Carey, of  <Amazon.com People: The Paradoxical Nature of Being Human.Â