Speaking of bird-based control systems...

Hey Bill et al: Thought you all might take a break from the brainy scientist stuff and enjoy a fine specimen of perceptual control theory in action:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dPlkFPowCc&feature=channel_page

[From Bill Powers (2009.08.21.1332 MDT)]

Hey Bill et al: Thought
you all might take a break from the brainy scientist stuff and enjoy a
fine specimen of perceptual control theory in action:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dPlkFPowCc&feature=channel_page

Brainy chicken stuff? Very neat. I saw this one a few years ago, and I
still, as one control engineer to another, admire that chicken. Many
years back I noticed the same thing in New Mexico birds walking through
underbrush. I called the result “head saccades” because it was
as if the birds jumped their heads from one fixation point to another as
they walked. When the neck couldn’t stretch any more, BANG a saccade to a
new position. I just happened to be in NM when I noticed this; I don’t
mean that birds in other states don’t do it.

Best,

Bill P.

···

At 11:51 AM 8/21/2009 -0500, Andrew Nichols wrote:

[From Rick Marken (2009.08.21.1340)]

Hey Bill et al:� Thought you all might take a break from the brainy
scientist stuff and enjoy a fine specimen of perceptual control theory in
action:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dPlkFPowCc&feature=channel_page

Thanks, Andrew. This is the second nice example of PCT research for
the day. I love the way the film makers put in the little box at one
point to show how the controlled variable (head position) remains
constant despite the disturbances (body position changes) that should
change it. And for a brief moment at the end of the clip you again see
the result of applying "insuperable" disturbances. In this case the
insuperable disturbance is moving the bird up and down too quickly
(two high a frequency of disturbance); When the chicken is moved up
and down two quickly, control of head position is lost.

Best

Rick

···

On Fri, Aug 21, 2009 at 9:51 AM, Andrew Nichols<anicholslcsw@gmail.com> wrote:
--
Richard S. Marken PhD
rsmarken@gmail.com
www.mindreadings.com

Even though the disturbance was (presumably) too much for the chicken,
I still maintained my control of the viewing portal (waited til our
feathered friend was viewable again). I love you guys :slight_smile:

···

On 8/21/09, Richard Marken <rsmarken@gmail.com> wrote:

[From Rick Marken (2009.08.21.1340)]

On Fri, Aug 21, 2009 at 9:51 AM, Andrew Nichols<anicholslcsw@gmail.com> > wrote:

Hey Bill et al:� Thought you all might take a break from the brainy
scientist stuff and enjoy a fine specimen of perceptual control theory in
action:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dPlkFPowCc&feature=channel_page

Thanks, Andrew. This is the second nice example of PCT research for
the day. I love the way the film makers put in the little box at one
point to show how the controlled variable (head position) remains
constant despite the disturbances (body position changes) that should
change it. And for a brief moment at the end of the clip you again see
the result of applying "insuperable" disturbances. In this case the
insuperable disturbance is moving the bird up and down too quickly
(two high a frequency of disturbance); When the chicken is moved up
and down two quickly, control of head position is lost.

Best

Rick
--
Richard S. Marken PhD
rsmarken@gmail.com
www.mindreadings.com