"supply-and-demand"

[From Norman Hovda (2000.04.14.0730 MST)]

[Shannon Williams (2000.04.14.2200 CST)]

> [From Norman Hovda (2000.04.12.2230)]
>
> > What do you do if you do not believe that 'shopping around' will alter
> > your perceptions?
>
> Stay conflicted and eventually reorganize.

The point here is that the law of supply-and-demand, that we
have been taught all of our lives depends upon our 'perceptions'
of the available supply and our 'perceptions' of available demand.
Not *actual* supply and demand.

It's all perceptions, yes. Did I write something that lead you to believe
otherwise?

In fact, it looks to me like the law of supply-and-demand
flat contradicts PCT except in the case where what the
participants perceive to be true, is actually what is true.

Contradicts? How so? That not what I see relative to my work with the
mkts.

For example, supply-and-demand assumes that if there are
10 companies selling the same TV model, the company
with the best price will sell more of the model.

Quality and delivery are part of that perception IMO, not just price.

It does not
even take into account that customers might not know
of the existance of all of the companies. It does not
account for how marketing and salesmanship sku
the numbers.

I'm lost.

Supply-and-demand does not
predict well when what we perceive, is not what is.

Even more lost...

> > You mean that conflicts just spontaneously resolve?
>
> Sometimes. More often than not going up a level helps shift one's
> perspective.
>
> > There are noprocesses
> > which affect this process one way or the other?
>
> "This process" being one that "spontaneously resolve[s]"? I see all
> kinds of systems and processes that "affect", interact or disturb other
> processes. I'm not sure I understand your question.

My point is that quite often when two control systems interact,
there is the potential for conflict.

Yes. I'm ok with that. Buyer v. seller... consumer v. producer.

Often this conflict is avoided
simply because there are certain behaviors that we learn over our
lives that minimize the conflict.

Depending on one's system concepts and respective reference levels
conflict may escalate or maintained at tolerable levels no? Seems to me
crativity may be a controlled conflict of sorts.

(Noisey, interupting, disrespectful,
lying, or thieving children have usually not yet learned this behavior) So
our conflicts are not spontaneously resolved, we learn how to resolve them.

If I understand your claim, and I'm not confident that I do, I responded
with the ideas in mind that "spontaneous" was more unconscious than
conscious, more automatic than intended, but I wouldn't argue that's it's
learned or hard wired... I don't know.

When this resolution process is externalized, we call it 'government'.

Hmmmmm... can you say more? Interesting idea but can you give a
more concrete example?

But the process exists regardless of whether someone writes it down and
tries to make it 'fair'.

Shannon

The dynamics of human personality and relationships have a great deal
that I'm sure remains undiscovered and undocumented. So?

"Fair" according to whom?

I feel as if I have only a small glimpse of what you're suggesting. I have
no idea where this thread is going. Help.

nth

[Shannon Williams (2000.04.14.2200 CST)]

[From Norman Hovda (2000.04.14.0730 MST)]
>
> The point here is that the law of supply-and-demand, that we
> have been taught all of our lives depends upon our 'perceptions'
> of the available supply and our 'perceptions' of available demand.
> Not *actual* supply and demand.

> [Supply-and-demand] does not
> even take into account that customers might not know
> of the existance of all of the companies. It does not
> account for how marketing and salesmanship sku
> the numbers.

I'm lost.

What happens when our perceptions of the available quality,
delivery, price, or whatever, does not match the actual quality,
delivery, price, or whatever?

What does supply-and-demand predict in this case?

What do you predict using 'common sense'?

What do you predict using PCT?

Shannon

[From Norman Hovda (2000.04.15.1710 MST)]

[Shannon Williams (2000.04.14.2200 CST)]

> [From Norman Hovda (2000.04.14.0730 MST)]
> >
> > The point here is that the law of supply-and-demand, that we
> > have been taught all of our lives depends upon our 'perceptions'
> > of the available supply and our 'perceptions' of available demand. Not
> > *actual* supply and demand.
>
> > [Supply-and-demand] does not
> > even take into account that customers might not know
> > of the existance of all of the companies. It does not
> > account for how marketing and salesmanship sku
> > the numbers.
>
> I'm lost.

What happens when our perceptions of the available quality,
delivery, price, or whatever, does not match the actual quality,
delivery, price, or whatever?

Price change.

What does supply-and-demand predict in this case?

*If* I understand your question... for example, if the mkt was looking for
a tight supplies and new reports develop suggesting actual bounty,
prices will fall.

What do you predict using 'common sense'?

See above.

What do you predict using PCT?

In my example above, huge buyer error requiring major reorganization or
adjustment to minimize error before the next margin call.

Best,
nth

[Shannon Williams (2000.04.17.2200 CST)]

[From Norman Hovda (2000.04.15.1710 MST)]

>
> What happens when our perceptions of the available quality,
> delivery, price, or whatever, does not match the actual quality,
> delivery, price, or whatever?

Price change.

What would make it change? If I am not disatisfiedwith the price, and you are
not disatisfied with the price, what
would it change?

Shannon

At 22:45 Shannon wrote about Re: "supply-and-demand" on 17 Apr 2000,

[Shannon Williams (2000.04.17.2200 CST)]

> [From Norman Hovda (2000.04.15.1710 MST)]
>
> >
> > What happens when our perceptions of the available quality,
> > delivery, price, or whatever, does not match the actual quality,
> > delivery, price, or whatever?
>
> Price change.

What would make it change?

Maybe I don't understand your question? Are you asking about hallucinations?

If I am not disatisfiedwith the price, and you
are not disatisfied with the price, what would it change?

Shannon

If we're both satisfied then we have a deal, no? If things don't measure
up we don't have a deal. No business gets done. If the supplier offers a
poorer yet acceptable quality, I may still do business but I'll want a price
break. OTOH, if demand is high and quantities limited, even lower
quality delivered late may still command higher prices.

"What would it change?" you ask? I'm clueless... what's "it". Price? My
level of satisfaction.

Maybe if you give me a specific example I could follow better. Sorry to
be so dense.

nth