The Brain Controlling Fatigue

Hi Guys,

Check out this very scientific TED talk that discusses where muscle fatigue comes from. It is towards the end of the talk. He basically describes a feedback-loop where ‘fatigue is all in you mind’ and is a way the brain ‘keeps you from killing yourself’.

http://www.upworthy.com/well-that-pretty-much-disproves-everything-i-thought-i-knew-about-the-human-body

Take Care,

Shannon

[From Rick Marken (2013.04.24.1000)]

Hi Shannon

···

On Tue, Apr 23, 2013 at 6:47 PM, Shannon Williams verbingle@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Guys,

Check out this very scientific TED talk that discusses where muscle fatigue comes from. It is towards the end of the talk. He basically describes a feedback-loop where ‘fatigue is all in you mind’ and is a way the brain ‘keeps you from killing yourself’.

http://www.upworthy.com/well-that-pretty-much-disproves-everything-i-thought-i-knew-about-the-human-body

Hate to be a spoil sport but I didn’t find this very scientifically satisfying. The feedback model is quite primitive; what’s missing (as usual) is a description of the controlled variable (s) (if it’s “fatigue” then what, exactly, is fatigue; sure, it’s a perception in your mind but perceptions are functions of physical – in this case probably physiological – variables; what are they; if it’s not a perception but, rather, a hallucination, then why does everyone experience it?); also missing (as usual) is the reference specification for the controlled variable; where does the specification for the controlled variable come from.

When he says ‘fatigue is all in you mind’ he implies that it a perception (or hallucination) that is superfluous in some way. But then he says it’s the way the brain ‘keeps you from killing yourself’ which implies that controlling for fatigue is a matter of life and death. This strikes me as very confusing. Am I supposed to ignore fatigue because it is just “in my mind” and risk dying when I do it; of is the the control of fatigue by the brain just a silly think it does because the brain thinks fatigue can kill you but it’s only a shadow that he’s chasin’.

But I do love the guy’s accent;-)

Best

Rick


Richard S. Marken PhD
rsmarken@gmail.com
www.mindreadings.com

[From Shannon Williams (2013.04.24.1204)]

You are correct! Venus did not spring fully formed from his head. But, his controlled perceptions are evolving in the direction needed, such that the seeds of PCT could be planted. Additionally, he was not talking to a crowd that understood PCT. No telling what he would say sitting on a couch talking only to Rick Marken.

···

On Wed, Apr 24, 2013 at 12:00 PM, Richard Marken rsmarken@gmail.com wrote:

[From Rick Marken (2013.04.24.1000)]

Hi Shannon

On Tue, Apr 23, 2013 at 6:47 PM, Shannon Williams verbingle@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Guys,

Check out this very scientific TED talk that discusses where muscle fatigue comes from. It is towards the end of the talk. He basically describes a feedback-loop where ‘fatigue is all in you mind’ and is a way the brain ‘keeps you from killing yourself’.

http://www.upworthy.com/well-that-pretty-much-disproves-everything-i-thought-i-knew-about-the-human-body

Hate to be a spoil sport but I didn’t find this very scientifically satisfying. The feedback model is quite primitive; what’s missing (as usual) is a description of the controlled variable (s) (if it’s “fatigue” then what, exactly, is fatigue; sure, it’s a perception in your mind but perceptions are functions of physical – in this case probably physiological – variables; what are they; if it’s not a perception but, rather, a hallucination, then why does everyone experience it?); also missing (as usual) is the reference specification for the controlled variable; where does the specification for the controlled variable come from.

When he says ‘fatigue is all in you mind’ he implies that it a perception (or hallucination) that is superfluous in some way. But then he says it’s the way the brain ‘keeps you from killing yourself’ which implies that controlling for fatigue is a matter of life and death. This strikes me as very confusing. Am I supposed to ignore fatigue because it is just “in my mind” and risk dying when I do it; of is the the control of fatigue by the brain just a silly think it does because the brain thinks fatigue can kill you but it’s only a shadow that he’s chasin’.

But I do love the guy’s accent;-)

Best

Rick


Richard S. Marken PhD
rsmarken@gmail.com

www.mindreadings.com

[From Rick Marken (2013.04.24.1045)]

Shannon Williams (2013.04.24.1204)

SW: You are correct! Venus did not spring fully formed from his head. But, his controlled perceptions are evolving in the direction needed, such that the seeds of PCT could be planted.

RM: I think the seeds of PCT will find more fertile ground in young people who have no firm existing beliefs about human nature. My experience is that prior beliefs (agenda’s), no matter how similar they seem to PCT, make it impossible for the believer to ever “get” PCT.

SW: Additionally, he was not talking to a crowd that understood PCT. No telling what he would say sitting on a couch talking only to Rick Marken.

RM: As long as he doesn’t try to get me to swim in the Arctic and he pays for my flight to Cape Town I’m in;-)

Best

Rick

···

On Wed, Apr 24, 2013 at 12:00 PM, Richard Marken rsmarken@gmail.com wrote:

[From Rick Marken (2013.04.24.1000)]

Hi Shannon

On Tue, Apr 23, 2013 at 6:47 PM, Shannon Williams verbingle@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Guys,

Check out this very scientific TED talk that discusses where muscle fatigue comes from. It is towards the end of the talk. He basically describes a feedback-loop where ‘fatigue is all in you mind’ and is a way the brain ‘keeps you from killing yourself’.

http://www.upworthy.com/well-that-pretty-much-disproves-everything-i-thought-i-knew-about-the-human-body

Hate to be a spoil sport but I didn’t find this very scientifically satisfying. The feedback model is quite primitive; what’s missing (as usual) is a description of the controlled variable (s) (if it’s “fatigue” then what, exactly, is fatigue; sure, it’s a perception in your mind but perceptions are functions of physical – in this case probably physiological – variables; what are they; if it’s not a perception but, rather, a hallucination, then why does everyone experience it?); also missing (as usual) is the reference specification for the controlled variable; where does the specification for the controlled variable come from.

When he says ‘fatigue is all in you mind’ he implies that it a perception (or hallucination) that is superfluous in some way. But then he says it’s the way the brain ‘keeps you from killing yourself’ which implies that controlling for fatigue is a matter of life and death. This strikes me as very confusing. Am I supposed to ignore fatigue because it is just “in my mind” and risk dying when I do it; of is the the control of fatigue by the brain just a silly think it does because the brain thinks fatigue can kill you but it’s only a shadow that he’s chasin’.

But I do love the guy’s accent;-)

Best

Rick


Richard S. Marken PhD
rsmarken@gmail.com

www.mindreadings.com