"This is like magic"

[From Matti Kolu (2014.01.21.1730 CET)]

Watch the first 1m 35s of this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvMA10NuZG8

If you can make that kind of impression with a simple inverted
pendulum robot, try to imagine what kind of attention an actuated CS
that is able to control for more advanced variables will be able to
get.

A sufficiently advanced perceptual control system is indistinguishable
from a living being.

Matti

[David Goldstein (2014.01.21.12:33)]

Thanks Matti. Bill Powers would have gotten a kick out of this.
He was way ahead of his time.

David

···

On Tuesday, January 21, 2014 11:41 AM, Matti Kolu matti.kolu@GMAIL.COM wrote:

[From Matti Kolu (2014.01.21.1730 CET)]

Watch the first 1m 35s of this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvMA10NuZG8

If you can make that kind of impression with a simple inverted
pendulum robot, try to imagine what kind of attention an actuated CS
that is able to control for more advanced variables will be able to
get.

A sufficiently advanced perceptual control system is indistinguishable
from a living being.

Matti

Matti Kolu (2014.01.21.1730 CET)

If you can make that kind of impression with a simple inverted
pendulum robot, try to imagine what kind of attention an actuated CS
that is able to control for more advanced variables will be able to
get.

A sufficiently advanced perceptual control system is indistinguishable
from a living being.

You'll love this guy and his dancing bots: <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utV1sdjr4PY&gt;http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utV1sdjr4PY
Adam

Matti,
You are right. I really enjoyed it. Robots can be fun!
David

···

On Wednesday, January 22, 2014 10:17 AM, Adam Matic adam.matic@GMAIL.COM wrote:

Matti Kolu (2014.01.21.1730 CET)

If you can make that kind of impression with a simple inverted

pendulum robot, try to imagine what kind of attention an actuated CS

that is able to control for more advanced variables will be able to

get.

A sufficiently advanced perceptual control system is indistinguishable

from a living being.

You’ll love this guy and his dancing bots: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utV1sdjr4PY

Adam

[From Adam Matic, 2014.01.22 1800 CET]

Sorry David, that was from me. Forgot to add the header. They are fun, aren’t they!

It’s obvious the author is not familiar with PCT, but I’m fairly certain his robots involve interesting feedback loops. There is some programmed, planned, behavior, but there is also some matching of ‘robot behavior’ to ‘human behavior’, and that’s what makes them look alive.

It’s great how at the end he gets a standing ovation. It’s like people can see something is ‘wrong’ with the robots today, something is missing.

Adam

[From Matti Kolu (2014.01.22.2100)]

Adam Matic (2014.01.22 1800 CET)--

There is some programmed,
planned, behavior, but there is also some matching of 'robot behavior' to
'human behavior', and that's what makes them look alive.

I stumbled upon the works of Edward Ihnatowicz some years ago, so I
was unfortunately a little disappointed by Hoffman's robots.

Ihnatowicz's the Senster was built 45 years ago:

Edward Ihnatowicz - Cybernetic Art: A personal statement

Quote:

"The sight of this big, swaying head coming down from 15 feet away to
hover uncertainly in front of you was more moving than you'd suppose.

There was no attempt to conceal the hydraulics, cables and computer. I
had seen it being made, and had observed the hole it made in
Ihnatowicz's ceiling when it once ran amok. Yet it was impossible not
to regard it as being alive.

It would remember the origin of a loud sound or a violent motion and
not return there for some time. Only constant pleading and soft
gestures would eventually bring it back down again to give you a
second change.

The Senster was ET made from metal -- a sheep in wolf's clothing.

And as with ET get out your Kleenex as the pathos mounts: people were
thought to be taking too much interest in it, as it stood in the
Evoluon, Philips' science and technology showcase in Eindhoven,
Holland. Couples, it said, had wedding photographs taken in front of
it. Kids watched it for four, five hours at a time."

The people at Philips considered The Senster to be _too interesting_
and _too attention-grabbing_, so they started modifying to make it
more boring.

Some old images and preserved technical details:

Matti

From Adam Matic 2014.01.22 2150 CET

The Senster really is impressive for a 1970’s robot. Weird how no one continued along the same path of creating “purposeful movement” in robots.

Adam

···

On Wed, Jan 22, 2014 at 9:02 PM, Matti Kolu matti.kolu@gmail.com wrote:

[From Matti Kolu (2014.01.22.2100)]

Adam Matic (2014.01.22 1800 CET)–

There is some programmed,

planned, behavior, but there is also some matching of ‘robot behavior’ to

‘human behavior’, and that’s what makes them look alive.

I stumbled upon the works of Edward Ihnatowicz some years ago, so I

was unfortunately a little disappointed by Hoffman’s robots.

Ihnatowicz’s the Senster was built 45 years ago:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wY85GrYGnyw

Edward Ihnatowicz - Cybernetic Art: A personal statement

http://www.senster.com/ihnatowicz/articles/ihnatowicz%20brochure.pdf

Quote:

"The sight of this big, swaying head coming down from 15 feet away to

hover uncertainly in front of you was more moving than you’d suppose.

There was no attempt to conceal the hydraulics, cables and computer. I

had seen it being made, and had observed the hole it made in

Ihnatowicz’s ceiling when it once ran amok. Yet it was impossible not

to regard it as being alive.

It would remember the origin of a loud sound or a violent motion and

not return there for some time. Only constant pleading and soft

gestures would eventually bring it back down again to give you a

second change.

The Senster was ET made from metal – a sheep in wolf’s clothing.

And as with ET get out your Kleenex as the pathos mounts: people were

thought to be taking too much interest in it, as it stood in the

Evoluon, Philips’ science and technology showcase in Eindhoven,

Holland. Couples, it said, had wedding photographs taken in front of

it. Kids watched it for four, five hours at a time."

The people at Philips considered The Senster to be too interesting

and too attention-grabbing, so they started modifying to make it

more boring.

Some old images and preserved technical details:

http://www.senster.com/ihnatowicz/senster/index.htm

Matti

[From Matti Kolu (2014.01.22.2300 CET)]

Adam Matic 2014.01.22 2150 CET--

The Senster really is impressive for a 1970's robot. Weird how no one
continued along the same path of creating "purposeful movement" in robots.

Ihnatowicz himself said that "felt like a fraud and resolved that any
future monster of mine would be more genuinely intelligent." According
to a paper about him, "He found it disconcerting that "people kept
referring to it as an intelligent thing, but there wasn't an iota of
intelligence in it".

Not unlike The Crowd demo...

Quotes from:
Zivanovic. The development of a cybernetic sculptor: Edward Ihnatowicz
and the senster. C&C '05 Proceedings of the 5th conference on
Creativity & cognition, p 102-108, 2005, ISBN:1-59593-025-6
doi:10.1145/1056224.1056240

Online at: Wayback Machine

Matti

[From Bruce Abbott (2014.01.23.0755 EST)]

Matti Kolu (2014.01.22.2300 CET)]

Adam Matic 2014.01.22 2150 CET--

The Senster really is impressive for a 1970's robot. Weird how no one
continued along the same path of creating "purposeful movement" in robots.

MK: Ihnatowicz himself said that "felt like a fraud and resolved that any
future monster of mine would be more genuinely intelligent." According to a
paper about him, "He found it disconcerting that "people kept referring to
it as an intelligent thing, but there wasn't an iota of intelligence in it".

MKNot unlike The Crowd demo...

While we're on the subject of early developments in robotics, we shouldn't
forget Grey Walter's "turtles," which were developed in 1948-49. These had a
steerable nose-wheel at front with a photocell attached to it. As the wheel
turned, the photocell "looked" in the direction the wheel was pointing. The
circuit could be set so that the turtle moved either toward or away from
light. When a light was added to the backs of the turtles and the circuit
set to "attraction," they followed each other around as in the Crowd demo.
Normally, however, the machines avoided light until the battery ran low.
Then light avoidance switched to light seeking, the machine approached a
light in a charging station, entered the station, and recharged itself.

See the video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLULRlmXkKo .

Bruce