Book and file available

[From Dag Forssell (960707 10:30)]

1) Last night, I posted a scan excerpt of Bruce Gregory's book in three
parts. This morning I spent a little more time on my file, cleaning up
quotation marks and italics. In the process I found a few misreads.
Italics is especially difficult for OCR when the type is in small point
size. Therefore, I suspect I found most faults, but have still not proofed
the rest.

The file is available in Word format on request. It is easy for me to send
it as an attached file.

2) I have procured 15 copies of the new, British edition of the Plooij's book:

   WHY THEY CRY.
   Understanding Child Development in the First Year

   Hetty van de Rijt and Frans Plooij

London: Thorsons (Harper Collins), 1996. ISBN 0 7225 3161 3

I expect to bring several copies to Flagstaff. The asking price is $20.
Will mail on request. Just send $25, which includes postage.

Contents

    Introduction viii

1: Growing Up: How Does Your Baby Do It? 1
2: Newborn: How Does Your Baby First Experience His World? 14
3: 5 Weeks: The World of Sensations 35
4: 8 Weeks: The World of Patterns 51
5: 12 Weeks: The World of Smooth Transitions 79
6: 19 Weeks: The World of Events 105
7: 26 Weeks: The World of Relationships 143
8: 37 Weeks: The World of Categories 193
9: 46 Weeks: The World of Sequences 229

    Postscript 267
    Useful Addresses 269
    Index 271

[Hans Blom, 960709]

(Dag Forssell (960707 10:30))

1) Last night, I posted a scan excerpt of Bruce Gregory's book in three
parts. This morning I spent a little more time on my file, cleaning
...
The file is available in Word format on request. It is easy for me to send
it as an attached file.

That was a fascinating read! I recognize a familiar soul. As to me, I
discovered the limitations of language through the analytic philoso-
phers, who likewise demonstrate that words do not refer to the "real"
world but to our knowledge -- or lack of knowledge -- of it. Thus,
the meaning of a word is the set of connotations that is has in the
mind of the speaker, listener or reader. Regrettably, these sets are
never the same, which will always limit understanding. If the set
overlap is small, one person's truth may be another person's
gibberish.

Quantum mechanics, too, is not about the world but about our
knowledge of it. Strangely, maybe, my understanding of the wave
function came about through Kalman Filtering theory, in which the
position coordinates of a satellite in orbit, for instance, is not
accurately known but only known as a "probability cloud". Many people
assume, intuitively, that the uncertainty of its position increases
somewhat exponentially to infinity if no measurements are made. This
is often not the case: the uncertainty reaches a limit beyond which
it does not further explode (or only very, very slowly). This seems
also the case with the wave function: it reaches its steady state
rather rapidly. It "collapses" (but not necessarily to a "point"
probability or singularity) when a new measurement is made.

Oh, what I wanted to say is: please send me the Word file. Have you
been able to scan in the whole book yet?

An idea. I don't know whether a device like this exists already.
Design a device whose input is a pile of books and whose output is
those books as electronic documents. The parts are largely available,
I guess, but not the whole thing. It would be great to make all those
inaccessible "outdated" works in the cellars of libraries available
again.

Greetings,

Hans