DragonflEye: non-behaviorist remote-controlled dragonfly

Saw this article shared on my Facebook today and thought it was very relevant to PCT!

That article is announcing a milestone of the project. An earlier one goes into more depth about the technology, and notes:

> “Previous attempts to guide insect flight used larger organisms like beetles and locusts so that they could lift relatively large electronics systems that weighed up to 1.3 grams. These systems did not include navigation systems and required wireless commands to guide flight. Two approaches were attempted: Spoofing sensory inputs to trigger flight behaviors, and directly stimulating the neurons and muscles that control the wings. The challenge with spoofing sensory inputs is that organisms often adapt and learn to ignore the sensory information that isn’t consistent with other senses. The challenge with directly controlling wings is that it degrades the insect’s inherently elegant neuromuscular control required for sustained stable flight.”

My facebook friends were also talking about the ethics of this (I have cool facebook friends!) and I found myself thinking that as long as it doesn’t produce conflict for the insect, it’s probably better than controlling animals via reward/punishment! (Separate question about the ethical status of dragonflies)

···

Malcolm

PS: I just joined this forum in the past couple of weeks. I’ve read a bunch of BCP, MSoB, and various other sources, and am very keen on PCT. I’ll give myself a further introduction at some future point, perhaps.

Malcolm Ocean

Achieve your personal and professional goals with  Complice

Read my latest blog post: Beyond “Giving Feedback�: Co-Attending & Attunement

[From Rick Marken (2017.06.05.1115)]

···

On Sun, Jun 4, 2017 at 8:45 AM, Malcolm Ocean malcolm.m.ocean@gmail.com wrote:

Saw this article shared on my Facebook today and thought it was very relevant to PCT!

Hi Malcolm and welcome to CSGNet. The article does describe some amazing technology. And the research is certainly relevant to PCT – everything that involves the behavior of living organisms is relevant to PCT, or vice versa – but I would be interested in knowing why you think it is. I think that would give us a some sense of how familiar you are with PCT. Indeed, I would be interested in know how you discovered PCT and what you’ve read about it.Â

Again, welcome to CSGNet.

Best regards

Rick

That article is announcing a milestone of the project. An earlier one goes into more depth about the technology, and notes:

> “Previous attempts to guide insect flight used larger organisms like beetles and locusts so that they could lift relatively large electronics systems that weighed up to 1.3 grams. These systems did not include navigation systems and required wireless commands to guide flight. Two approaches were attempted: Spoofing sensory inputs to trigger flight behaviors, and directly stimulating the neurons and muscles that control the wings. The challenge with spoofing sensory inputs is that organisms often adapt and learn to ignore the sensory information that isn’t consistent with other senses. The challenge with directly controlling wings is that it degrades the insect’s inherently elegant neuromuscular control required for sustained stable flight.”

My facebook friends were also talking about the ethics of this (I have cool facebook friends!) and I found myself thinking that as long as it doesn’t produce conflict for the insect, it’s probably better than controlling animals via reward/punishment! (Separate question about the ethical status of dragonflies)

Malcolm

PS: I just joined this forum in the past couple of weeks. I’ve read a bunch of BCP, MSoB, and various other sources, and am very keen on PCT. I’ll give myself a further introduction at some future point, perhaps.

Malcolm Ocean

Achieve your personal and professional goals with  Complice

Read my latest blog post: Beyond “Giving Feedback�: Co-Attending & Attunement

Richard S. MarkenÂ

"Perfection is achieved not when you have nothing more to add, but when you
have nothing left to take away.�
                --Antoine de Saint-Exupery