PCT, Buy In & Bitching

I've been thinking about PCT and innovation and the problems associated
with the diffusion of innovation and change management and the processes of
"signing on" and "buying in" and such matters -- all in light of the tenor
and tone of the CSG messages for lo these many moons. At first I was
inclined to think in terms of immovable objects (Bill P and Rick M) and
irresistible forces (no names given) but then decided that Bill and Rick
are doing a pretty good job of not budging so the irresistible force piece
of that equation doesn't appear to be in place. Then I thought about
strategies for obtaining "buy in" -- particularly the notion of leaving
enough wiggle room so people can put their mark on things and thus make
them theirs -- but that would be like letting kids tinker with the
Pythagorean theorem so they would "own" it. They might indeed develop a
sense of ownership but the tinkered-with version would doubtless be worth
less than the original. Maybe PCT, like the Pythagorean theorem, ought to
be pretty much an immovable object -- unless and until someone can provide
empirical support for a change (without that, proposed changes are
themselves pretty theoretical and, unless some pretty persuasive logic can
be assembled, that's not likely to lead anywhere except to endless
"tinkering" and that's not very productive).

Now I have to add that I think Bill P and Rick Marken are pretty remarkable
characters; they have taken a tremendous amount of verbal abuse (and,
although Rick can be pretty darn sarcastic and biting when he's of a mind
to, I don't recall him ever being downright abusive in the ways some others
have). Yet, they're still here, still being reasonably civil and still
willing to discuss and explain PCT with those who have genuine questions or
even issues (even if their exasperation does show from time to time).

Others on the list sometimes lose their cool, too. They, too, are still
here. Still poking away, picking at what they see as flaws or blemishes or
errors in thinking or holes in the theory or whatever.

All this leads me to ask Bill P and Rick M if the crowd demo or something
like it might be used to model the behavior patterns displayed on the
list. Is all this just a giant case of chaos, the result of everyone
struggling to maintain perceptions in the face of disturbances OR is what
I'm seeing on the list in fact a successful case of most people being very
successful at maintaining perceptions. In other words, is all this
bitching in fact the zero-error state?

ยทยทยท

--
Fred Nickols
The Distance Consulting Company
"Assistance at A Distance"
http://home.att.net/~nickols/distance.htm
nickols@worldnet.att.net
(609) 490-0095

[From Bill Powers (991211.0606 MDT)]

Fred Nickols (991211) --

I've been thinking about PCT and innovation and the problems associated
with the diffusion of innovation and change management and the processes of
"signing on" and "buying in" and such matters -- all in light of the tenor
and tone of the CSG messages for lo these many moons.

Thanks much, Fred. Wise words thankfully received.

Best,

Bill P.