VS: VS: Behavioural Illusion (was Re: What is revolutionary about PCT?)

[Eetu Pikkarainen 2017-10-16 2]

[Martin Taylor 2017.10.13.08.51]

···

(…)

[EP]
Seemingly I can at the moment think only about integral controllers where remaining error causes the strengthening of the output. If I want to move an object to a place x and it will not
go there I will push more and more until it is there (in the tolerance zone) and the error is zero

MT:
A question for you.

What are you considering to be the output of your position control system? The position of the object or the force that changes the velocity and/or acceleration of its change of position? Remember that the derivative of an integral of a variable is the
variable itself.

Hmm, I am afraid this is a trick question. Anyway I dare to try to answer. My answer is the latter. If a system controls the position of an object (or rather its perception
of that position) then the position is the CEV and the output is any force by which the system can affect that position. If there is error, i.e. the object is in a wrong position then the output force must move the object and thus affect its velocity and or
acceleration.

I did not remember that. For my shame I remember very little if anything from integral calculus in the school and after that I have been a diehard humanist. Now I
know that this is a basic theorem but what has it to do with that question? :slight_smile:

Eetu

Please, regard all my statements as questions,

no matter how they are formulated.

Martin

[Eetu
Pikkarainen 2017-10-16 2]

[Martin Taylor 2017.10.13.08.51]

···

(…)

[EP] Seemingly I can at the moment think only
about integral controllers where remaining error causes
the strengthening of the output. If I want to move an
object to a place x and it will not go there I will push
more and more until it is there (in the tolerance zone)
and the error is zero

      MT:           A question for you.
      What are you considering to be the output of your

position control system? The position of the object or the
force that changes the velocity and/or acceleration of its
change of position? Remember that the derivative of an
integral of a variable is the variable itself.

        Hmm, I am afraid this

is a trick question.